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Relating to previous question : Python3 split() with generator .

Is there a way of splitting list using generator or iterator, but more efficient than creating regular expression ?

I suppose that ".split()" is not implemented with regular expressions.

I would love to see equivalent, but without creating whole splitted list in memeory, but "on-the-fly" with generator or iterator.

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2 Answers 2

This seems a bit faster than regex:

def itersplit2(s, sep):
    i = 0
    l = len(sep)
    j = s.find(sep, i)
    while j > -1:
        yield s[i:j]
        i = j + l
        j = s.find(sep, i)
    else:
        yield s[i:]

But 10 times SLOWER than str.split

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1  
My +1 for the simpler code. It only need to be fixed. The sep is to be used instead of the ' ', the +len(sep) should be used instead of the +1. Actually, the str.split is implemented in the C language, hence the speed. The question seems to be rather akademic. The string already is in the memory. The str.split will use only a little bit more than about the same amount of memory for the resulting list. It is probably more memory efficient not to read extremely big strings into memory than to optimize the str.split. –  pepr May 25 '12 at 21:55
    
@pepr: Thanks for reminding. Fixed. –  Kabie May 25 '12 at 23:39

Here is the version for the separator different from None:

def iter_split(s, sep):
    start = 0
    L = len(s)
    lsep = len(sep)
    assert lsep > 0
    while start < L:
        end = s.find(sep, start)
        if end != -1:
            yield s[start:end]
            start = end + lsep
            if start == L:
                yield ''    # sep found but nothing after
        else:
            yield s[start:] # the last element
            start = L       # to quit the loop

I did not tested it heavily, so it may contain some bug. The results compared with the str.split():

sep = '<>'
s = '1<>2<>3'
print('--------------', repr(s), repr(sep))
print(s.split(sep))
print(list(iter_split(s, sep)))

s = '<>1<>2<>3<>'
print('--------------', repr(s), repr(sep))
print(s.split(sep))
print(list(iter_split(s, sep)))

sep = ' '
s = '1 2 3'
print('--------------', repr(s), repr(sep))
print(s.split(sep))
print(list(iter_split(s, sep)))

s = '1   2   3'
print('--------------', repr(s), repr(sep))
print(s.split(sep))
print(list(iter_split(s, sep)))

It displays:

-------------- '1<>2<>3' '<>'
['1', '2', '3']
['1', '2', '3']
-------------- '<>1<>2<>3<>' '<>'
['', '1', '2', '3', '']
['', '1', '2', '3', '']
-------------- '1 2 3' ' '
['1', '2', '3']
['1', '2', '3']
-------------- '1   2   3' ' '
['1', '', '', '2', '', '', '3']
['1', '', '', '2', '', '', '3']

The implementation for the default None separator would be more complex as there are more rules.

Anyway, precompiled regular expressions are quite efficient. They are error prone when writing them, but once ready, they are fast.

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