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I would like to ask all my fellow programmers regarding only efficiency. I am currently solving problems that could be asked in job interviews and I've come across with the famous permutations of a string. The code I've written below might be the most common thing in programming history, however, I do not know it's status since I haven't checked for any solution.

Long story would the short the program I've coded below be a suitable solution? Or can it be made even more efficient. Asking because if I came across one day I would like to be sure that I've implement one of the best approaches for this problem.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int fac(int num)
{
    int result=1;
    for(int i=1;i<=num;i++)
        result*=i;
    return result;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    string str="abcd";
    int limit=fac(str.size());
    int mod=str.size();
    for(int i=0;i<limit;i++){
        swap(str[i%mod],str[(i+1)%mod]);
        cout<<str<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
You know about std::next_permutation, right? – Blastfurnace May 25 '12 at 20:47
    
Yeah I do. But did not refer to it since its an std library, not a solution I've come up with – Ali May 25 '12 at 20:53
    
If you're not interested in people correctly telling you not to reinvent the wheel, then this belongs on CodeReview.SE instead of SO. – ildjarn May 25 '12 at 20:56
    
I am soooo thankful I've never had to go through one of those interviews, and the nutty questions they're liable to ask. That's an advantage to a history of consulting and/or teaching. Your reputation precedes you. – Mike Dunlavey May 26 '12 at 1:30

Doesn't handle duplicated letters within the string, e.g. "aaabbb".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the feedback. I'll be checking it! By the way, any suggestions :D? – Ali May 25 '12 at 20:28
    
Think about sort... – Michael Dorgan May 25 '12 at 21:35

You could use recursion:

#include <iostream>
#include <tchar.h>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

void swap(char &first, char &second) {
    char tmp = first;
    first = second;
    second = tmp;
}

void enumPermutations(string &p, int m)
{
    if (m == p.size() - 1)
        cout << p << endl;
    else
        for (int j = m; j < p.size(); j++) {
            swap(p[j], p[m]);
            enumPermutations(p, m+1);
            swap(p[j], p[m]);
        }
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    string str = "abcd";
    enumPermutations(str, 0);
    getchar();
    return 0;
}

(compiled and tested in Visual Studio).

share|improve this answer
    
Probably slower but good to know options (esp. for interview prep) – djechlin May 25 '12 at 21:04
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I've figured out the solution by using a std::map. Don't think it is that inefficient;

#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

int fac(int num)
{
    int result=1;
    for(int i=1;i<=num;i++)
        result*=i;
    return result;
}
int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    string str="aabb";
    int limit=fac(str.size());
    int mod=str.size();
    std::map<string,bool>T;
    vector<string>permutations;
    for(int i=0;i<limit;i++){
        if(T[str]==0){
            permutations.push_back(str);
            T[str]=1;
        }
        swap(str[i%mod],str[(i+1)%mod]);
    }
    for(int i=0;i<permutations.size();i++)
        cout<<permutations[i]<<endl;
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If you're willing to use the standard library, then why not use std::next_permutation? I don't get it. – ildjarn May 25 '12 at 20:56
    
There's value in implementing your own solution, it's good practice. Of course, if you want to "get stuff done" and be more productive use the Standard Library. – Blastfurnace May 25 '12 at 22:11

The answer to your question is NO. You should not worry about the efficiency of any proposed solution until you know that it works. And this one does not work.

The following demonstrates that fact.

ben-tillys-macbook-pro:ton btilly$ cat foo.cc
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int fac(int num)
{
    int result=1;
    for(int i=1;i<=num;i++)
        result*=i;
    return result;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    string str="abcd";
    int limit=fac(str.size());
    int mod=str.size();
    for(int i=0;i<limit;i++){
        swap(str[i%mod],str[(i+1)%mod]);
        cout<<str<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}
ben-tillys-macbook-pro:ton btilly$ g++ foo.cc
ben-tillys-macbook-pro:ton btilly$ ./a.out | wc
      24      24     120
ben-tillys-macbook-pro:ton btilly$ ./a.out | sort -u | wc
      12      12      60
ben-tillys-macbook-pro:ton btilly$ ./a.out | grep bdc
ben-tillys-macbook-pro:ton btilly$ 
share|improve this answer
    
I've corrected the code. Check my answer and thanks for the contribution – Ali May 25 '12 at 21:38
    
@rolandbishop Your code still looks the same. – btilly May 25 '12 at 22:05

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