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My XML document has arbitrarily nested sections. Given a reference to a particular section I need to find all the TextNodes in that section not including subsections.

For example, given a reference to the #a1 node below, I need to find only the "A1 " and "A1" text nodes:

<root>
  <section id="a1">
    <b>A1 <c>A1</c></b>
    <b>A1 <c>A1</c></b>
    <section id="a1.1">
      <b>A1.1 <c>A1.1</c></b>
    </section>
    <section id="a1.2">
      <b>A1.2 <c>A1.2</c></b>
      <section id="a1.2.1">
        <b>A1.2.1</b>
      </section>
      <b>A1.2 <c>A1.2</c></b>
    </section>
  </section>
  <section id="a2">
    <b>A2 <c>A2</c></b>
  </section>
</root>

In case it wasn't obvious, the above is made-up data. The id attributes in particular may not exist in the real-world document.

The best I've come up with for now is to find all text nodes within the section and then use Ruby to subtract out the ones I don't want:

def own_text(node)
  node.xpath('.//text()') - node.xpath('.//section//text()')
end

doc = Nokogiri.XML(mydoc,&:noblanks)
p own_text(doc.at("#a1")).length #=> 4

Can I craft a single XPath 1.0 expression to find these nodes directly? Something like:

.//text()[ancestor::section = self] # self being the original context node
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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use (for the section with id attribute having string value of "a1"):

   //section[@id='a1']
       //*[normalize-space(text()) and ancestor::section[1]/@id = 'a1']/text()

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="/">
     <xsl:copy-of select=
      "//section[@id='a1']
           //*[normalize-space(text()) and ancestor::section[1]/@id = 'a1']
     "/>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied on the provided XML document:

<root>
    <section id="a1">
        <b>A1 
            <c>A1</c>
        </b>
        <b>A1 
            <c>A1</c>
        </b>
        <section id="a1.1">
            <b>A1.1 
                <c>A1.1</c>
            </b>
        </section>
        <section id="a1.2">
            <b>A1.2 
                <c>A1.2</c>
            </b>
            <section id="a1.2.1">
                <b>A1.2.1</b>
            </section>
            <b>A1.2 
                <c>A1.2</c>
            </b>
        </section>
    </section>
    <section id="a2">
        <b>A2 
            <c>A2</c>
        </b>
    </section>
</root>

It evaluates the XPath expression (selecting just the parents of the wanted text nodes -- in order to have clearly visible results) and copies the selected nodes to the output:

<b>A1 
            <c>A1</c>
</b>
<c>A1</c>
<b>A1 
            <c>A1</c>
</b>
<c>A1</c>

UPDATE: In case the section elements can have same id attributes (or no id attributes at all) use:

       (//section)[1]
           //*[normalize-space(text())
           and
              count(ancestor::section)
             =
               count((//section)[1]/ancestor::section) +1]/text()

XSLT - based verification:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
     xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
     <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
     <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

     <xsl:template match="/">
         <xsl:copy-of select=
          "(//section)[1]
               //*[normalize-space(text())
               and
                  count(ancestor::section)
                 =
                   count((//section)[1]/ancestor::section) +1]
         "/>
     </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

Transformation result (same):

<b>A1 
            <c>A1</c>
</b>
<c>A1</c>
<b>A1 
            <c>A1</c>
</b>
<c>A1</c>

This selects exactly the same wanted text nodes.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you do this without relying on the id attribute? That was just a demo document to illustrate and discuss the point clearly. Imagine nested <section> elements with no distinguishing attributes. –  Phrogz May 26 '12 at 2:22
    
Yes, see the update to this answer. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 26 '12 at 2:38
    
Nice; I forget about using count(), but even once you started using it I couldn't figure out how you'd "store" the count. That still won't work directly within Ruby/XPath (since the unique node is . when starting the new context), but this appears to answer the question for generic XPath. –  Phrogz May 26 '12 at 2:55
1  
@Phrogz: You are welcome. Yes, for unidentified initial context node these aren't possible to select with a single XPath 1.0 expression, unless it is executed in a special execution context, set up by the host of the XPath processor. In the case of XSLT 1.0, one can use the current() and/or generate-id() function, so this is possible. If you can use XSLT 1.0 it would be possible to select specific nodes that otherwise is not possible to do with a single XPath expression outside of the XSLT context. And, of course, these are easier to select with XPath 2.0. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 26 '12 at 4:10
1  
+1 Nicely accomplished! –  Cylian May 26 '12 at 5:57
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Use:

//text()[ancestor::section[1]/@id = 'a1']
share|improve this answer
    
This will only work if each section has a unique id attribute. That happens to be the case in my sample data above, but not a general solution. +1, but no accept for this. –  Phrogz May 26 '12 at 0:50
    
@Phrogz: If this is the case, you need to specify this in the text of the question. You also need to specify how a particular section can be uniquely selected, because this is a necessary prefix of the wanted XPath expression. See my answer for a solution that doesn't rely on the uniqueness of ids. –  Dimitre Novatchev May 26 '12 at 2:37
    
@Dimitre Any section could be uniquely selected via, for example, //section[27] or (in reality for my case) doc.xpath('//section').each{ |section| …use this specific section reference as an anchor for a new XPath expression… } –  Phrogz May 26 '12 at 2:41
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