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I am trying to separate my worker code from my GUI code into an entirely different class, but I want to be able to report back to my GUI for progress update and file output. For example, I want to have my GUI say to the worker class, "Read ten lines from the serial port, but report to me each thing you read as you receive it". Currently my best way to do it is to have the GUI loop ten times and in each loop send a command to the worker class to read one thing and return it.

I would really prefer to keep all of the looping on the side of my worker class, since it will have more information of what is available (the actual amount of data will be variable, and the worker class already has access to the amount of data available, and I would prefer not to send this back to the GUI class to run the loop itself.

I have looked into backgroundworker but that seems to only report percentage done during a lengthy operation, and nothing else, so that would not help me much here. Does anybody have a good idea how I can accomplish this?

Below is a shell of a program to try to (hopefully) better illustrate what I want to do. How would you edit the code to do what I require?

The GUI's main class:

class Main_Class
{
    ...
    /*  Assume in the area we have instantiated these items and placed them on the form:
    *   Button  DoSomething:  A button to do something
    *   TextBox ShowInfo:  A text box to report something from the worker class     
    */

    Worker_Class timewaster = new Worker_Class();

    private void buttonDoSomething_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        timewaster.a_lengthy_task();
    }
}

The separate worker class:

class Worker_Class
{
    ...//Various Setup stuff up here

    void a_lengthy task()
    {
        int iteration = 0;

        while(iteration < 10)
        {
            Datetime saveNOW = Datetime.Now;        //lets say I report this back to the the GUI to write in that ShowInfo box
            Thread.sleep(10000);                    //To waste time and make this lengthy

            //Your code here to facilitate sending saveNOW back to the the Main_Class and display it on the ShowInfo textbox.

            iteration++
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
It's all about the worker class! –  Mehrdad May 25 '12 at 21:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

What you need is events. If you can't work around what's built into the BackgroundWorker class to get it to work for you, you can at least model your solution after what it does.

The worker class should have a public event IterationComplete or whatever you want to call it. You can give it an EventArgs object (or an object that extends EventArgs) that contains the information relevant to that iteration that the UI will need. The event can be fired after each iteration is complete (or whenever the UI modifications should take place).

The UI can then subscribe to the event for all UI tasks related to that iteration.

Code sample:

Main class:

public class MainClass
{
    Worker_Class timewaster = new Worker_Class();


    private void buttonDoSomething_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        timewaster.IterationComplete += new EventHandler<Worker_Class.IterationEventArgs>(timewaster_IterationComplete);
        timewaster.LengthyTask();
    }

    void timewaster_IterationComplete(object sender, Worker_Class.IterationEventArgs e)
    {
        string infoFromWorker = e.iterationNumber;
    }
}

Worker class:

public class Worker_Class
{
    //Various Setup stuff up here

    public class IterationEventArgs : EventArgs
    {
        public string iterationNumber { get; set; }
    }

    public event EventHandler<IterationEventArgs> IterationComplete;

    public void LengthyTask()
    {
        int iteration = 0;

        while (iteration < 10)
        {
            DateTime saveNOW = DateTime.Now;        //lets say I report this back to the the GUI to write in that ShowInfo box
            Thread.Sleep(10000);                    //To waste time and make this lengthy

            //Your code here to facilitate sending saveNOW back to the the Main_Class and display it on the ShowInfo textbox.

            if (IterationComplete != null)
            {
                IterationEventArgs args = new IterationEventArgs();
                args.iterationNumber = iteration.ToString();
                IterationComplete(this, args);
            }

            iteration++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much Servy. This is exactly what I needed. I did see some other questions talk about using events to handle this, but I know very little about them currently, so I was unable to adapt them to my code from the other questions. Yours walks the fine line of being specialized to what I need (and giving it a context I understand), but general enough to help me learn how to use them, and just plain get the job done. Do you have any particular tutorials you would recommend for learning more about event handling in C#? –  Xantham May 25 '12 at 21:18

This is an ideal task for the BackgroundWorker class. Assuming your not using the compact framework it should be available for you to use.

On BackgroundWorker you can listen to the onCompleted and onProgressUpdated events. These are marshalled into the UI thread for you, and you can safely update your winform/wpf controls with them. To show progress, you call ReportProgress() within the DoWork() of the BackgroundWorker

When taking code into a separate thread, you need to be careful when updating the GUI controls. As the thread that updates the controls, must be the UI Thread. BackgroundWorker handles this for you.

MSDN - http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc221403(v=vs.95).aspx

share|improve this answer
    
As mentioned by the OP, he needs to pass more than the single integer the ReportProgress passes to the UI. –  Servy May 25 '12 at 21:11
    
My bad, I didnt spot that 3rd paragraph –  JonWillis May 25 '12 at 21:15

You will need to have your Worker_Class broadcast its progress via an event. The Main_Class will subscribe to this event and use the information to update the UI accordingly. You can branch off into two directions from here. You can use Control.Invoke to marshal this event handler onto the UI thread where you can safely update the GUI. Or you can just have the event handler save the progress information to a shared variable. Then have your UI poll this variable on a convenient interval via a System.Windows.Forms.Timer or DispatcherTimer. I prefer the later method in this case.

class YourForm : Form
{
  private volatile MyEventArgs progress = null;

  private void buttonDoSomething_Click(object sender, EventArgs args)
  {
    var timewaster = new Worker_Class();
    timewaster.ProgressChanged += (sender, args) { progress = args; };
    Task.Factory.StartNew(
      () =>
      {
        timewaster.a_lengthy_task();
      }
    UpdateTimer.Enabled = true;
  }

  private void UpdateTimer_Tick(object sender, EventArgs args)
  {
    if (progress != null)
    {
      if (progress.IsFinished)
      {
        ShowInfo.Text = "Finished";
        UpdateTimer.Enabled = false;
      }
      else
      {
        ShowInfo.Text = progress.SaveNow.Value.ToString();
      }
    }
    else
    {
      ShowInfo.Text = "No progress yet";
    }
  }
}

class Worker_Class
{
  public event EventHandler<MyEventArgs> ProgressChanged;

  public Worker_Class()
  {
    ProgressChanged += (sender, args) => { };
  }

  public void a_lengthy task()
  {
    int iteration = 0;
    while(iteration < 10)
    {
        Datetime saveNOW = Datetime.Now;
        Thread.sleep(10000);
        ProgressChanged(this, new MyEventArgs { SaveNow = saveNOW, IsFinished = false });
        iteration++
    }
    ProgressChanged(this, new MyEventArgs { SaveNow = null, IsFinished = true });
  }
}

class MyEventArgs : EventArgs
{
  public DateTime? SaveNow { get; set; }
  public bool IsFinished { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

In my background worker I use:

this.Invoke((MethodInvoker)delegate
{
    //do something in GUI
});

For example if you want to change a label in the GUI use

label.Text = "whatever";

inside the method.

share|improve this answer
    
This can work (if you pass along an instance of the UI class to the worker) but it doesn't separate out the UI code from the worker code, it just moves all of the code to the worker class. –  Servy May 25 '12 at 20:42
    
I see what you are saying. Thanks for clarifying. –  l3v May 25 '12 at 20:50

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