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What are the consequences (other than being poor code) of passing in a member item unnecessarily to a member function:

struct foobar
{
  char * arr; //properly initialized to SIZE at some point
}

class foo
{
  public:
    void bar(foobar&);
    foobar barfoo;
};


void foo::bar(foobar& barf)
{
    cin.get(barf.arr, SIZE, '\n');
    cin.ignore(100, '\n');
}

Is there any reason not to eliminate the parameters in bar altogether and just call barfoo directly? What are the consequences of NOT doing so, if any?

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1  
how do you call foo::bar()? You can't access the private member from outside the class. –  betabandido May 25 '12 at 20:58
2  
The semantics are different, neither is "wrong". –  ildjarn May 25 '12 at 20:58
    
Assuming its all public then or using a get_foobar function that returns a struct –  user1404053 May 25 '12 at 21:00
    
why would you want to do that? unless you want to pass different instances of foobar, of course –  betabandido May 25 '12 at 21:01
    
where do you pass a member? –  Walter May 25 '12 at 21:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is a slight overhead with passing the parameter, so if you will never call that method with another member, then you can get rid of the parameter. If you might need to do something like this in the future:

class foo 
{ 
  public: 
    void bar(foobar&); 

  private/*(or still public)*/: 
    foobar barfoo;
    foobar barfoo2;

    void some_other_method() {
      //do stuff
      bar(barfoo);
      bar(barfoo2);
}; 

Then I would leave it alone.

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It depends.

If the only context that foo::bar gets called in is when this->barfoo is passed as the parameter, then it's pretty silly (although not overtly harmful).

But in a situation where this->barfoo is not the only parameter that could get passed to the member function, then obviously it's fine.

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I realized I had been passing in a client_item to every function in the client class and never actually using any other item other than the client item, so in that situation I could have eliminated the param? –  user1404053 May 25 '12 at 21:01

One consequence would be that other instances of foobar could not be passed to the same method.

The question is not whether a member is sometimes sent to a method, but whether it is desirable for callers to be able to specify the parameter.

Since this is a public method, there may be callers other than this class.

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There is no reason not to eliminate it. At the very least you will be doing an extra dereference when you are passing it in the function.

However, if somethign is using bar(foobar&) from outside of your class, you can overload it and do something like this:

class foo {
public:
    void bar(); /* Uses default barfoo */
    void bar(foobar&);
    foobar barfoo; 
private:
};

viod foo:bar() {
     bar(barfoo);
}

void foo::bar(foobar& barf) {
    cin.get(barf.arr, SIZE, '\n');
    cin.ignore(100, '\n'); 
} 
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