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With the new version ggplot2 and scales, I can't figure out how to get axis label in scientific notation. For example:

x <- 1:4
y <- c(0, 0.0001, 0.0002, 0.0003)

dd <- data.frame(x, y)

ggplot(dd, aes(x, y)) + geom_point()

gives me

Example ggplot with scales

I'd like the axis labels to be 0, 5 x 10^-5, 1 x 10^-4, 1.5 x 10^-4, etc. I can't figure out the correct combination of scale_y_continuous() and math_format() (at least I think those are what I need).

scale_y_log10() log transforms the axis, which I don't want. scale_y_continuous(label = math_format()) just gives me 10^0, 10^5e-5, etc. I see why the latter gives that result, but it's not what I'm looking for.

I am using ggplot2_0.9.1 and scales_0.2.1

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I'm confused; those values (0, 5^-5, 1^-4, 1.5^-4) don't really match up with the data ranges in your plot. –  joran May 25 '12 at 23:09
    
Correct -- that wasn't clear. I've edited now. –  kmm May 25 '12 at 23:12
    
Possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/9651903/… ? –  Ben Bolker May 25 '12 at 23:34
    
@BenBolker I don't think that this is really a duplicate of the one you link to, in that that question was about a logarithmic scale and labels formatted as a base to a power (such that the powers are then linearly increasing). This is about labels on a linear scale in scientific notation. –  Brian Diggs May 26 '12 at 0:15
    
OK, I was too quick –  Ben Bolker May 26 '12 at 0:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I adapted Brian's answer and I think I got what you're after.

Simply by adding a parse() to the scientific_10() function (and changing 'x' to the correct 'times' symbol), you end up with this:

x <- 1:4
y <- c(0, 0.0001, 0.0002, 0.0003)

dd <- data.frame(x, y)

scientific_10 <- function(x) {
  parse(text=gsub("e", " %*% 10^", scientific_format()(x)))
}

ggplot(dd, aes(x, y)) + geom_point()+scale_y_continuous(label=scientific_10)

enter image description here

You might still want to smarten up the function so it deals with 0 a little more elegantly, but I think that's it!

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I know this is old, but per the comments on the accepted solution, OP is looking to format exponents as exponents. This can be done with the trans_format and trans_breaks` functions in the scales package:

    library(ggplot2)
    library(scales)

    x <- 1:4
    y <- c(0, 0.0001, 0.0002, 0.0003)
    dd <- data.frame(x, y)

    ggplot(dd, aes(x, y)) + geom_point() +
    scale_y_log10("y",
        breaks = trans_breaks("log10", function(x) 10^x),
        labels = trans_format("log10", math_format(10^.x)))

example

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scale_y_continuous(label=scientific_format())

gives labels with e instead of 10:

enter image description here

I suppose if you really want 10's in there, you could then wrap that in another function.

scientific_10 <- function(x) {
  gsub("e", " x 10^", scientific_format()(x))
}

ggplot(dd, aes(x, y)) + geom_point() + 
  scale_y_continuous(label=scientific_10)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
I was trying to figure out a way to combine this with the strategy in math_format() to get the exponents formatted properly, but it was getting complicated. –  joran May 25 '12 at 23:34
    
Is it possible to get the exponents as actual exponents? Otherwise, this is what I'm looking for. –  kmm May 26 '12 at 0:13
    
@Kevin It might be. The general approach would be to make the labels plotmath expressions. I don't know if you can return expressions for a labels function or not. I tried a few things, but couldn't get anything to work easily. Hopefully someone else can chime in. –  Brian Diggs May 26 '12 at 0:36
    
@joran I've added a solution to show how to format the exponents as you wanted (I know this is quite old, however). –  computermacgyver Aug 30 '13 at 6:50

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