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I want to have an interface ModelGenerator which has a method generate() that takes an iterable list of Evidence and creates a Model. Using the STL pseudo-duck-typing iterator idiom...

template<class Model>
class ModelGenerator {
  public:
    template<class Iterator>
    virtual bool generate(Iterator begin, Iterator end, Model& model) = 0;
};

But virtual functions can’t be templated. So I have to template the whole class:

template<class Model, class Iterator>
class ModelGenerator {
  public:
    virtual bool generate(Iterator begin, Iterator end, Model& model) = 0;
};

Ideally what I’d like to do is something like this...

template<class Model, class Evidence>
class ModelGenerator {
  public:
    virtual bool generate(iterator<Evidence>& begin,
                          iterator<Evidence>& end,
                          Model& model) = 0;
};

But there is no such interface that iterators inherit from. (The class std::iterator only contains a bunch of typedefs, no methods.)

The only way I can think of doing it is to give ModelGenerator a method addEvidence() which adds them one by one before calling generate(), but then I have to give the ModelGenerator state which is a bit of a pain.

How can I write a virtual method that takes any STL container?

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1  
CRTP might be useful here. –  Mehrdad May 25 '12 at 23:11
1  
You should think about factoring out all the iterator operations from the virtual function. The templated function might generate a std::vector< Evidence * > and pass that to the virtual function. The performance cost and programming effort of that sort of wrapper is likely to be less than any_iterator/any_range. –  Potatoswatter May 26 '12 at 4:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You seem to need an any_iterator. That's an iterator that performs type erasure to insulate you from the actual iterator implementation.

Adobe has an implementation of any_iterator: http://stlab.adobe.com/classadobe_1_1any__iterator.html

Boost has an implementation of any_range: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_49_0/libs/range/doc/html/range/reference/ranges/any_range.html

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1  
Keep in mind that any_iterator implementations are slow, so only use them when you have to. –  Mooing Duck May 25 '12 at 23:20
2  
There's any_range in Boost.Range. –  Cat Plus Plus May 25 '12 at 23:20
1  
@funkybluecoffee: Boost offers an implementation. –  Xeo May 25 '12 at 23:21
1  
I was unaware of Boost's any_range, and it certainly beats using two any_iterators! –  K-ballo May 25 '12 at 23:22
3  
@abarnert: The thing with any_iterator is that each advance, comparison, increment operation involves a virtual call. So the overhead is quite considerable, enough to be worth mention. –  K-ballo May 26 '12 at 0:52

You could consider to use template specialisation instead of virtual methods to this end. From what I understand, you have a unique Evidence class, a number of distinct Model classes and whant to create a generic factory to produce a selected Model from a sequence of Evidences.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>

struct Model1 { };
struct Model2 { };
struct Evidence { };

template<class Model>
struct ModelGenerator;

template<>
struct ModelGenerator<Model1>
{
    typedef Model1 model_type;

    template<class Iterator>
    model_type generate(Iterator begin, Iterator end)
    {
        std::cout << "Generate Model1\n";
        return model_type();
    }
};

template<>
struct ModelGenerator<Model2>
{
    typedef Model2 model_type;

    template<class Iterator>
    model_type generate(Iterator begin, Iterator end)
    {
        std::cout << "Generate Model2\n";
        return model_type();
    }
};

template<class Model, class Iterator>
Model make_model(Iterator begin, Iterator end)
{
    ModelGenerator<Model> gen;
    return gen.generate(begin, end);
}

You can use it this way:

int main()
{
    std::vector<Evidence> v;

    Model1 m1 = make_model<Model1>(v.begin(), v.end());
    Model2 m2 = make_model<Model2>(v.begin(), v.end());
}
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