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I have a simple html structure that I need to traverse. For some reason my recursive function returns 'undefined' on any nested nodes, but not for parent nodes. Unfortunately this needs to be native js, no jQuery for this one. Thanks!

HTML:

<div id="container">
  <div id="head"> 
    <span id="left"><</span> 
    <span id="right">></span> 
  </div>
</div>

Script:

var h = hasId(container, 'head');
var l = hasId(container, 'left');
var r = hasId(container, 'right');

console.log(h + " : " + r + " : " + l);
//[object HTMLDivElement] : undefined : undefined

function hasId(ele, id) {
    for (var i = 0; i < ele.childNodes.length; i++) {
        var child = ele.childNodes[i];
        if(child.id == id) return child;
        else hasId(child, id);
    }
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You are simply the call to return on the recursive call. Also, you should test whether its result is defined. If yes, you can return it, or continue looping if not.

var h = hasId(container, 'head');
var l = hasId(container, 'left');
var r = hasId(container, 'right');

console.log(h + " : " + r + " : " + l);
//[object HTMLDivElement] : undefined : undefined

function hasId(ele, id) {
    for (var i = 0; i < ele.childNodes.length; i++) {
        var child = ele.childNodes[i];
        if(child.id == id) return child;
        else {
          var next = hasId(child, id);
          if(next) return next;
        };
    }
}​
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your code is right, but you've fixed a much more subtle bug without explaining why. It's not just a missing return, as I had originally answered, but the fact that this return only happens if the result of the recursion was itself defined. –  Alnitak May 25 '12 at 23:24
    
Excellent! Thanks! –  worked May 25 '12 at 23:26
    
You're welcome =) On recursive call, the loop should continue if the result is undefined. So returning it directly doesn't work. –  Pierre May 25 '12 at 23:27
    
Thanks!!! Worked great...made sense once I read through this example, much appreciated. –  afreeland Jun 6 '12 at 13:36

The else clause should return the value of hasId(child, id), but only if that value is itself defined, otherwise it has to continue through the loop.

Without a return the function will recurse, but not give an answer.

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Just putting else return hasId(...) does not work. Pierre's answer, checking that the answer is defined, is correct. –  Paul Phillips May 25 '12 at 23:19
    
@PaulPhillips I spotted that just now too, but even Pierre's answer is incomplete - it never unwinds the recursion properly. –  Alnitak May 25 '12 at 23:20
    
@PaulPhillips ah, no, Pierre's answer does appear to fix that. –  Alnitak May 25 '12 at 23:21
    
Ha, I didn't actually read it. On the test input @worked gave, it succeeds: jsfiddle –  Paul Phillips May 25 '12 at 23:23

You can fix it like this :

var h = hasId(container, 'head');
var l = hasId(container, 'left');
var r = hasId(container, 'right');

console.log(h + " : " + r + " : " + l);

function hasId(ele, id) {
    for (var i = 0; i < ele.childNodes.length; i++) {
        var child = ele.childNodes[i];
        if(child.id == id || (child = hasId(child, id))){
           return child;
        }
    }
    return false;
}
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1  
This doesn't work. If the recurring call does not return any element, your function still returns, when it needs to continue iterating through elements. –  Pierre May 25 '12 at 23:16
    
you are right, i modified the answer and tested it –  Willem D'haeseleer May 25 '12 at 23:31

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