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I'm trying to use a vector of pointers of a class. When trying to access any of the members of the Agent class, I either get a bad pointer or null data. The code is the following.

class Grue : public Agent
{
    string name;
    Room *cur_room;
 public:
   Functions()....
};

class Agent
{
        Room *cur_room;
        string name;
  public:
         Functions()....
};


Grue* Grue1 = new Grue("Test", roompointer);
vector<Agent*> agents;
agents.push_back(Grue1);
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9  
You don't have to redeclare every data member in your Grue derived class –  lezebulon May 25 '12 at 23:55
    
what is the error you're getting? Are you declaring the destructor for Grue virtual? –  betabandido May 25 '12 at 23:56
1  
You should be following the Rule of Three/Five. Vectors copy around data a lot. I suspect this is where your problems are coming from. Also, you must inherit from a complete type, which you haven't done in defining Agent after Grue. –  chris May 25 '12 at 23:57
    
Errors include bad pointers when attempting to make calls and no data for things such as agent->name. –  John Ghotti May 25 '12 at 23:58
2  
The most likely problem is that by re-declaring the members in the derived class, the members in the base class never get initialized. Then you access the members through base class pointers, which means you access the uninitialized members of the base class. Since they are uninitialized, you will get undefined behavior. –  Chris Hayden May 26 '12 at 0:03

1 Answer 1

Data members are private by default in a class. Thus your cur_room, name variables are different in the Agent and Grue class. When you call the Grue constructor, the Grue fields are initialized, but the vector stores Agent pointers, therefor you are accessing the agent fields which are not initialized.

here's the correct way of doing this:

class Agent
{
protected:
    Room *cur_room;
    string name;
public:
    Agent(string n, Room * r)
    : cur_room (r), name(n)         
    {}
};

class Grue : public Agent
{

public:
    Grue(string n, Room * r):Agent(n,r)
    {

    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
This is correct, but a bit misleading. Whether the Agent members are private, protected, or public wouldn't change the fact that Grue is hiding them with members of the same name. (Also, if you're going to give someone sample code, you really should use member initializers in the ctor instead of assignment in the body.) –  abarnert May 26 '12 at 0:45

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