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I have the following rows:

CREATE TABLE #TEMP (id int, name varchar(255), startdate datetime, enddate datetime)
INSERT INTO #TEMP VALUES(1, 'John', '2011-01-11 00:00:00.000','2011-01-11 00:01:10.000')
INSERT INTO #TEMP VALUES(2, 'John', '2011-01-11 00:00:20.000','2011-01-11 00:01:05.000')
INSERT INTO #TEMP VALUES(3, 'John', '2011-01-11 00:01:40.000','2011-01-11 00:01:50.000')
INSERT INTO #TEMP VALUES(4, 'Adam', '2011-01-11 00:00:40.000','2011-01-11 00:01:20.000')
INSERT INTO #TEMP VALUES(5, 'Adam', '2011-01-11 00:00:45.000','2011-01-11 00:01:15.000')

SELECT * FROM #TEMP

DROP TABLE #TEMP

I am trying to remove records that have dates contained within other dates to obtain the following:

John 2011-01-11 00:00:00.000 2011-01-11 00:01:10.000
John 2011-01-11 00:01:40.000 2011-01-11 00:01:50.000
Adam 2011-01-11 00:00:40.000 2011-01-11 00:01:20.000

Any suggestions on how to achieve this for a table of about 100K rows?

share|improve this question
    
table-wide or by name? – John Dewey May 26 '12 at 0:07
    
@JohnDewey: By name – Legend May 26 '12 at 0:10
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This gives the desired result:

DELETE T1 FROM #TEMP T1
WHERE EXISTS(
    SELECT NULL FROM #TEMP T2
    WHERE   t1.id <> t2.id
    AND     t1.name = t2.name
    AND     t1.startdate >= t1.startdate
    AND     t1.enddate   <= t1.enddate
)

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188336.aspx

Edit: I've just noticed that there's one problem. If there are duplicates (same start- and enddate), both would be deleted (none with John's approach, even with only one equal date). So you need to take this into account:

DELETE T1 FROM #TEMP T1
WHERE EXISTS(
    SELECT NULL FROM #TEMP T2
    WHERE   t1.id <> t2.id
    AND     t1.name = t2.name
    AND     t1.startdate > t2.startdate
    AND     t1.enddate   < t2.enddate
    OR      t1.id <> t2.id
    AND     t1.name = t2.name
    AND     t1.startdate = t2.startdate
    AND     t1.enddate   < t2.enddate
    OR      t1.id <> t2.id
    AND     t1.name = t2.name
    AND     t1.startdate > t2.startdate
    AND     t1.enddate   = t2.enddate
    OR      t1.id > t2.id
    AND     t1.name = t2.name
    AND     t1.startdate = t2.startdate
    AND     t1.enddate   = t2.enddate
)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I maybe missing something but I did put this record in the output? – Legend May 26 '12 at 0:11
    
@Legend: Edited my answer, it was my fault :) – Tim Schmelter May 26 '12 at 0:16
2  
Both John and Tim have nice queries. I actualy thought that the join would be faster but it is certainly not (I am not considering indexes). I loaded up a test table with 2.384.001 random of data and the EXIST version finished in 1:43 while I stopped the JOIN version after 10 minutes. The estimate executions plans are different and give the EXIST quit less of logical reads while the actual plans for the 2.384.001 records produced the same plan if one only takes into account the operators. The EXISTS can stop scanning after it founds a match which is a big advantage. – buckley May 26 '12 at 0:58
    
@buckley: Noticed that both queries have problems with duplicates, edited my answer accordingly. – Tim Schmelter May 26 '12 at 1:25
DELETE t1 FROM #TEMP t1
INNER JOIN #TEMP t2 ON t2.startdate < t1.startdate AND t1.enddate < t2.enddate
AND t1.name = t2.name

Results match

share|improve this answer

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