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I am trying to trim a string to the first occurrence of a specific word in a single string of comma separated words. E.g.:

deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird","dog")

should return

"foo,bar,dog"

I have the following, and it doesn't seem to be working correctly:

public String deleteLastOccurrence(String original, String target){
    String[] arr = original.split(",");
    arr = Arrays.copyOfRange(arr, Arrays.asList(arr).indexOf(target), original.length()-1);
    path = StringUtils.join(pathArray,",");
}

Any suggestions on a simpler method? Thanks in advance...

share|improve this question
    
What is path? How is your method not working? (What output does it give for the input you've given?) –  sarnold May 26 '12 at 0:58
    
I'm having trouble understanding what this method is supposed to do. Does it delete everything after the first instance of the second argument? If I read your example use of "deleteLastOccurrance" in someone's code I would definitely not expect it to return "foo,bar,dog". Instead, I would expect "foo,bar,dog,cat,bird". –  Christopher Schultz May 26 '12 at 1:27
    
Using a combination of String.indexOf and String.substring will be suffice. –  dragon66 May 26 '12 at 1:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use regex replace:

public static String deleteLastOccurrence(String original, String target){
    return original.replaceAll("(,)?\\b" + target + "\\b.*", "$1" + target);
}

This code also works when the target is the first or last word in the original (hence the regex syntax \b which means "word boundary")

Also, rename your method to deleteAfterFirstOccurrence(), because your current name is misleading: The "last occurrence" is irrelevant to what you want.

Here's a little test:

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // Test for target in middle:
    System.out.println(deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird,dog", "dog"));
    // Test for target at start:
    System.out.println(deleteLastOccurrence("dog,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird,dog", "dog"));
    // Test for target at end:
    System.out.println(deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,cat,bird,dog", "dog"));
}

Output:

foo,bar,dog
dog
foo,bar,cat,bird,dog
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't that remove all occurances? Not just the last? (my Java is a little rusty) –  Wolph May 26 '12 at 1:02
    
@WoLpH This will trim the lot, because there's a .* at the end. –  Bohemian May 26 '12 at 1:03
    
Pretty slick. One question... don't you end up stripping off a comma when your match is in the middle and when you do the replace it doesn't get put back? –  cturner80 May 26 '12 at 1:09
    
Nice, right after I posted I saw the new edit that fixed the issue. :) –  cturner80 May 26 '12 at 1:10
    
@Bohemian: Wow, quite a change. That's not the version I was talking about. Looks like your function is correct, the deleteLastOccurance name seems wrong though :) –  Wolph May 26 '12 at 1:11

UPDATE: Looked closer at question and realized that I wrote the name of the method, not the result OP wanted. So, it just gets rid of the last occurrence, doesn't trim after it. Oh well! :)

Depending on your style, you might not think this is simpler. But, it was a fun problem. I think this code is a bit more clear.

public class ReplaceLast {

public String deleteLastOccurrence(String fromThis, String word){
    int wordLength = word.length();
    if(fromThis.startsWith(word + ",")){
        return fromThis.substring(wordLength + 1);
    }
    if(fromThis.endsWith("," + word)){
        return fromThis.substring(0, fromThis.length() - wordLength - 1);
    }
    int index = fromThis.lastIndexOf("," + word + ",");
    if(index == -1){
        return fromThis;
    }
    return fromThis.substring(0, index) + fromThis.substring(index+word.length() + 1);
}
@Test
public void testNotThere() {
    String actual = deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird","moose");
    assertEquals("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", actual);
}
@Test
public void testMiddle() {
    String actual = deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird","dog");
    assertEquals("foo,bar,dog,cat,bird", actual);
}

@Test
public void testFirst() {
    String actual = deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird","foo");
    assertEquals("bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", actual);
}

@Test
public void testLast() {
    String actual = deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird","bird");
    assertEquals("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog", actual);
}

@Test
public void testSubword() {
    String actual = deleteLastOccurrence("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird","bir");
    assertEquals("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", actual);
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
I believe that this code will trim the String if the word is "do" (not "dog".) Which is, I think, incorrect behavior. (Though OP is a bit unclear - here's where you go back and check the requirements. :-) –  user949300 May 26 '12 at 1:22
    
Doh! You are right. :) Needs to be a full word match. –  coreyhaines May 26 '12 at 1:24
    
Edited! Should work now. –  coreyhaines May 26 '12 at 1:33
1  
Finding out that @coreyhaines is practicing java is priceless :) –  gicappa May 26 '12 at 21:14

I tried to solve the problem of trimming a string on the first occurrence of a specific word and I didn't care about the original name of the method (deleteLastOccurrence) that is IMO misleading.

The trick to match only single word and not subwords for me is to add two commas before and after the sentence and then check the word with commas.

i.e. ",dog," will be checked against ",foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird," for presence.

package gicappa;

public class So {
    public static String trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf(String sentence, String word) {
        if (word.isEmpty()) return sentence;

        if (!addCommasAround(sentence).contains(addCommasAround(word))) return sentence;

        return trimAddedCommasOf(substringOfSentenceUntilEndOfWord(addCommasAround(sentence), addCommasAround(word)));
    }

    public static String substringOfSentenceUntilEndOfWord(String string, String word) {
        return string.substring(0, string.indexOf(word) + word.length());
    }

    public static String trimAddedCommasOf(String string) {return string.substring(1,string.length()-1);}

    public static String addCommasAround(String s) {return "," + s + ","; }
}

and if you'd fancy some testing I used for TDD, here we go:

package gicappa;

import org.junit.Test;

import static gicappa.So.trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf;
import static org.hamcrest.core.Is.is;
import static org.hamcrest.core.IsEqual.equalTo;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;

public class SoTest {
    @Test
    public void it_returns_the_same_sentence_for_empty_word() {
        assertThat(trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", ""), is(equalTo("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird")));
    }

    @Test
    public void it_returns_the_same_sentence_for_not_contained_word() {
        assertThat(trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", "s"), is(equalTo("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird")));
    }

    @Test
    public void it_returns_the_first_word() {
        assertThat(trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", "foo"), is(equalTo("foo")));
    }

    @Test
    public void it_returns_the_same_sentence_if_is_matched_the_last_word() {
        assertThat(trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", "bird"), is(equalTo("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird")));
    }

    @Test
    public void it_trims_after_the_end_of_the_first_matched_word() {
        assertThat(trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", "dog"), is(equalTo("foo,bar,dog")));
    }

    @Test
    public void it_does_not_trim_for_a_subword_of_a_contained_word() {
        assertThat(trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird", "do"), is(equalTo("foo,bar,dog,cat,dog,bird")));
    }

    @Test
    public void it_does_not_trim_for_a_subword_of_an_already_contained_word() {
        assertThat(trimSentenceOnFirstOccurrenceOf("dog,foozzo,foo,cat,dog,bird", "foo"), is(equalTo("dog,foozzo,foo")));
    }
}

A wordy refactoring for a more OO class could also be:

package gicappa;

public class Sentence {
    private String s;

    public Sentence(String sentence) {
        this.s = sentence;
    }

    public String trimOnFirstOccurrenceOf(String word) {
        if (word.isEmpty() || csvSentenceContainsWord(word)) return s;

        return substringSentenceToEndOf(word);
    }

    private String substringSentenceToEndOf(String word) {
        return addCommasTo(s).substring(1, addCommasTo(s).indexOf(addCommasTo(word)) + addCommasTo(word).length()-1);
    }

    private boolean csvSentenceContainsWord(String word) {
        return !addCommasTo(s).contains(addCommasTo(word));
    }

    public static String addCommasTo(String s) {return "," + s + ",";}
}

with usage like:

new Sentence("dog,foozzo,foo,cat,dog,bird").trimOnFirstOccurrenceOf("foo"), is(equalTo("dog,foozzo,foo"))
share|improve this answer
1  
I think you have to return sentence.substring(0, sentence.indexOf(addCommasTo(word)) + word.length()); or you will match e.g. foo in "dog,foozzo,foo,cat,dog,bird" with "dog,foo" where instead you have to return dog,foozzo,foo –  Andrea Parodi May 26 '12 at 20:20
    
yups you are right but I have to grok it a bit more than that. Thanks –  gicappa May 26 '12 at 20:44

How about this:

public String deleteLastOccurrence(String original, String target){
    return original.replace("(^|,)" + target + "(,|$)", "");
}
share|improve this answer
    
I believe this will replace all of them, no? Or at least not the last. –  coreyhaines May 26 '12 at 1:27
    
@coreyhaines: I expect replace to replace ones and replaceAll to replace all of them actually :) –  Wolph May 26 '12 at 14:18

Here's a try at a non-regex version:

public String trimTo(String in, String matchNoCommas) {
   if (in.startsWith(matchNoCommas + ","))  // special check here...
      return matchNoCommas;
   int idx = in.indexOf("," + matchNoCommas+ ",");
   if (idx < 0)
      return in;
   return in.substring(0, idx + matchNoCommas.length()+1);
}

Provides the same results as the regex version by @Bohemian. Your call as to which is more understandable.

share|improve this answer

Maybe I'm wrong, but wouldn't this do?

public trimCommaSeparatedListToIncludeFirstOccurrenceOfWord(String listOfWords, String wordToMatch) {
    int startOfFirstOccurrenceOfWordToMatch = listOfWords.indexOf(wordToMatch);
    int endOfFirstOccurrenceOfWordToMatch = startOfFirstOccurrenceOfWordToMatch + wordToMatch.length() - 1;

    return listOfWords.substring(0, endOfFirstOccurrenceOfWordToMatch);
}

Now this might not be what the OP wanted, but I think it's what the OP asked for. Example: f("doggy,cat,bird", "dog") would return "dog".

For full-word matching, I'd regex the sucker as others have suggested.

share|improve this answer
    
I see your point of simplicity but you should at least check the case of word not present to avoid incorrect responses. Something like "if (! listOfWords.contains(wordToMatch)) return listOfWords;" –  gicappa May 26 '12 at 18:11
    
I think in your example the OP would the code to return "doggy,cat,bird", "dog". He wnat to tsearch for whole words occurrences. –  Andrea Parodi May 26 '12 at 20:14
    
Ah yes, @gicappa: every time I don't write tests, I miss a simple boundary case. –  J. B. Rainsberger May 26 '12 at 21:44

gonzoc0ding, after reading all responses, IMHO your way of do it is the simpler and cleaner, except that should be corrected this way:

public String deleteLastOccurrence(String original, String target){
    String[] arr = original.split(",");
    arr = Arrays.copyOfRange(arr,0, Arrays.asList(arr).indexOf(target));
    path = StringUtils.join(arr,",");
}

But maybe I have not understand your requirements...

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