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If the function is:

void foo(struct* bar)
{
}

And

struct foobar;

Is a single instance of struct, will the call

foo(foobar);

Be treated as if it were a pointer to a one member array? Will the call be legal or does it require an overload?

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1  
That shouldn't compile a) because you used the struct keyword as a class name, and b) because you're missing an ampersand (&) in your call, or put in an extra asterisk into your function parameter list (presumably the former based on your question). – chris May 26 '12 at 3:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is a single instance of struct, will the call foo(foobar); Be treated as if it were a pointer to a one member array? Will the call be legal or does it require an overload?

No, it will not. The call is not legal, and an overload could make the call work.

If a function needs a pointer to a struct, then you have to give it a pointer to a struct. Arrays are special since they decay to a pointer to the first element.

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