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Let say we have Class A and Class B. ClassB extends Class A. (ClassB : ClassA)

Now let's say that whenever I instantiate ClassB, I'd like to Run some Random code and only then call "base" to reach ClassA constructor.

Like:

class ClassA
{
    public ClassA()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Initialization");
    }  
}

class ClassB : ClassA
{
    public ClassB() //: base() 
    {
        // Using :base() as commented above, I would execute ClassA ctor before                                                         //          Console.WriteLine as it is below this line... 
        Console.WriteLine("Before new");
        //base() //Calls ClassA constructor using inheritance
        //Run some more Codes here...
    }
}

In the programming language I usually work with, I can do that, by simply calling "super()" after Console.WriteLine(); But I cant make it in C#. Is there any other syntax or other way to do that?

Thanks!

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There is no way to do that using base constructor in C#. You can extract out the login in a base method and call it using base.Method(). –  decyclone May 26 '12 at 5:48
    
You can't do that with C# –  Lior Ohana May 26 '12 at 5:48
    
Which language do you usually work with? Because if it's Java, you're mistaken - you can't do that there either... –  Jon Skeet May 26 '12 at 6:18
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6 Answers

There's a hacky way of doing it using an instance variable initializer:

using System;

class ClassA
{
    public ClassA()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Initialization");
    }  
}

class ClassB : ClassA
{
    private readonly int ignoreMe = BeforeBaseConstructorCall();

    public ClassB()
    {
    }

    private static int BeforeBaseConstructorCall()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Before new");
        return 0; // We really don't care
    }
}

class Test
{
    static void Main()
    {
        new ClassB();
    }    
}

The less hacky way of doing it is to rethink how you construct a ClassB to start with. Instead of having clients call the constructor directly, provide a static method for them to call:

public static ClassB CreateInstance()
{
    Console.WriteLine("Before initialization stuff");
    return new ClassB();
}
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You can't do that with C#. Your best bet is to extract that code into it's own method in the parent and then call that from the child when you're ready.

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C# doesn't allow calling base constructors inside constructor bodies, different from Java.

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You can not call base constructor. But a different thing is that when you declare an object of derived class both constructor derived and base is called.

    class ClassA
{
    public ClassA()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Initialization");
    }  
}

class ClassB : ClassA
{
    public ClassB() //: base() 
    {
        // Using :base() as commented above, I would execute ClassA ctor before                                                         //          Console.WriteLine as it is below this line... 
        Console.WriteLine("Before new");
        //base() //Calls ClassA constructor using inheritance
        //Run some more Codes here...
    }
}
void main(string[] args)
    {
      ClassB b = new ClassB();

    }
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Another hack if you can get away with calling a static method.

public class ClassA
{
    public ClassA()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Call A Constructor");
    }
}

public class ClassB:ClassA
{
    public ClassB():this(aMethod())
    {
    }

    private ClassB(object empty):base()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Class B Second Constructor");
    }

    private static object aMethod()
    {
        Debug.WriteLine("Run me First");
        return null;
    }
}
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Recently I ran into a scenario where I needed to calculate some logic before passing the result into base.

I could just do something like

public SomeConstructor: base(FlagValue == FlagValues.One || FlagValues.Two ? "OptionA" : "OptionB")
{

}

But I find that to be ugly, and can get really long horizontally. So I opted instead to use Func Anonymous methods.

E.g. imagine you have a base class,

public class SomeBaseClass
{
  public SomeBaseClass(Func<string> GetSqlQueryText){
    string sqlQueryText = GetSqlQueryText();
    //Initialize(sqlQueryText);
  }
}

Now you inherit from that and want to do some logic to determine the sql query text,

public class SomeSqlObject : SomeBaseClass
{
  public SomeSqlObject(ArchiveTypeValues archiveType)
        : base(delegate()
        {
            switch (archiveType)
            {
                case ArchiveTypeValues.CurrentIssues:
                case ArchiveTypeValues.Archived:
                    return Queries.ProductQueries.ProductQueryActive;
                case ArchiveTypeValues.AllIssues:
                    return     string.Format(Queries.ProductQueries.ProductQueryActiveOther, (int)archiveType);
                default:
                    throw new InvalidOperationException("Unknown archiveType");
            };
        })
    {
        //Derived Constructor code here!
    }

}

In this way you can execute code before Base is called and (in my opinion) it's not really hacky.

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