Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following c code. I want to display my file with less by calling execv() however the following seems never work. The program terminates and noting pop out.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main(void){
  int pid; 
  if(pid=fork()>0){
      //read in from stdin and pass to pipe
   }else if(pid==0){
      //read from pipe
      //write to out.txt
      //everything up to here works fine

      char* para[]={"less","/Desktop/out.txt"};
      execv("/bin/less",para);
   }
   return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
This will most likely be closed because of lack of effort... Just as a pointer, though - = is assignment, == is equality; you might want to review your code. – Ken White May 26 '12 at 5:57
    
sorry, In my c file it is pid=fork()>0 – pythonikun May 26 '12 at 6:01
up vote 1 down vote accepted

(The original code contained execv("bin/less", para);.) Unless the current directory is the root directory, /, or unless there is a program less in the subdirectory ./bin/less, then one of your problems is that you have a probable typo in the name of the executable. That assumes the program is /bin/less and not /usr/bin/less. You might even use execvp() to do a PATH-based search for the program.

There's an additional problem: you need to include a null pointer to mark the end of the argument list.

Finally, you can print an error message after the execv() returns. The mere fact that it returns tells you it failed.

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
    int pid;
    if ((pid = fork()) != 0)
    {
        // read in from stdin and pass to pipe
        // Need to test for fork() error here too
    }
    else
    {
        // read from pipe
        // write to out.txt
        // everything up to here works fine

        char *para[] = { "/bin/less", "Desktop/out.txt", 0 };
        execv(para[0], para);
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to execute %s\n", para[0]);
        exit(1);
    }
    return 0;
}

Or:

        char *para[] = { "less", "Desktop/out.txt", 0 };
        execvp(para[0], para);
        fprintf(stderr, "Failed to execute %s\n", para[0]);

The remarks in the code about pipes are puzzling since there is no sign of pipes other than in the comments. As it stands, less will read the file it is told to read. Note that less will not paginate its output if the output is not going to a terminal. Since we can see no I/O redirection, we have to assume, then, that less will ignore anything the program tries to write to it, and will not send any data back to the program.

share|improve this answer
    
ok, i tried 'char *para[] = { "/usr/bin/less", "Desktop/out.txt", 0 }; execv(para[0],para); printf("error");' .The error msg wasn't come out and I have tested the data read from pipe is good. I can assume the execv() worked right? And how do redirect the less output to console? all I know about less is type in terminal "$ less somefile"..... – pythonikun May 26 '12 at 6:27
    
Your example only shows your program trying to run less Desktop/out.txt. There was no I/O redirection in your code, so it will read from the file and your keyboard, and it will write to the screen (console). Create yourself the named file, and you should see that. You might want to add #include <sys/wait.h> to the headers and wait(0); in the if clause. You mention pipes; your code does not show pipes. I'm not clear if you are trying to write to less or read from less, for example. (I know which I think it should be, but that doesn't mean much.) Maybe you need a new question? – Jonathan Leffler May 26 '12 at 12:37
char* para[]={"less","/Desktop/out.txt"};
execv("/bin/less",para);

How does execv know when to stop reading parameters?

I think if you'd put code in there to handle execv() returning an error you'd have found this. You're also not testing for errors from fork().

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.