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I have a Rails 3.2 application that tracks mailings for subscription orders.

The basic model structure is:

Order has_many Subscriptions has_many SubscriptionMailings

Each month a record for each subscription mailing is generated and a csv file is exported from these records.

The mailing address is stored at the order level.

Basically I select all of the subscriptions that are valid to mail that month and loop through them getting the mailing address from the order object. Then I create a new subscription mailing record for each one.

Right now this works ok because there aren't a lot of subscriptions, but it is pretty slow.

How can I speed up this process?

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Can you post a log excerpt that would show us the queries with their duration? Also is it pure db operations that take so long or is there also some application-level logic at play(callbacks, observers or complex validations)? –  Renra May 26 '12 at 6:52

3 Answers 3

In order to optimize, you need to step down from Ruby level onto the SQL level here.

Instead of doing N+1 selects (1 for fetching all subscription and N for fetching all orders for each subscription) you may be able to do only 1 select with join.

SubscriptionMailing.
  joins(:subscrtiption).
  joins(:order).
  where(Order.table_name => { valid: true })
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Sounds like you want to use includes to eager load the orders. Maybe something like this:

# Subscription.rb
scope :valid_for_month lambda {|month| where(month: month)}

# Elsewhere
valid_subscriptions = Subscription.valid_for_month(Time.now.month).includes(:order)
valid_subscriptions.each do |subscription|
  subscription.generate_subscription_mailing
end

More on includes: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Associations/ClassMethods.html

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

After some research I ended up wrapping my code in a transaction without making any other changes.

It sped up things quite a bit.

Before I added the transaction the code was taking over 1 minute to run, now it is down to roughly 10 seconds. This is plenty fast enough for my needs, so I didn't try and optimize any further.

ActiveRecord::Base.transaction do
   # my db stuff here
end
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