Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In a C code, I need to check if a pattern matches on at least one line of a file. I need a caret in my expression. What I have is:

const char *disambiguate_pp(SourceFile *sourcefile) {
        char *p = ohcount_sourcefile_get_contents(sourcefile);
  char *eof = p + ohcount_sourcefile_get_contents_size(sourcefile);

        /* prepare regular expressions */
        pcre *re;
        const char *error;
        int erroffset;
        re = pcre_compile("^\\s*(define\\s+[\\w:-]+\\s*\\(|class\\s+[\\w:-]+(\\s+inherits\\s+[\\w:-]+)?\\s*{|node\\s+\\'[\\w:\\.-]+\\'\\s*{)",
                          PCRE_MULTILINE, &error, &erroffset, NULL);

        for (; p < eof; p++) {
                if (pcre_exec(re, NULL, p, mystrnlen(p, 100), 0, 0, NULL, 0) > -1)
                        return LANG_PUPPET;

        }
        return LANG_PASCAL;
}

For some reason, the caret seems ignored, as the following line matches the regexp (and should not):

  // update the package block define template (the container for all other

I tried a lot of things, but could not get this working. What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Why are you looping for (; p < eof; p++)? Wouldn't p eventually point right at define, so it becomes first in a string? –  Vsevolod Golovanov May 26 '12 at 9:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want to use PCRE_MULTILINE, you pass it the whole buffer as a single string, and it tells you whether there is a match anywhere in the string. The for loop is not only superfluous, it will erroneously make PCRE think it is looking at the beginning of the string (hence also beginning of line) when you pass it a position in the middle of the buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. For the record, I added my final code as an answer. –  ℝaphink May 26 '12 at 11:47

You could use Mode modifier for this reason. Using (?m) at the start of a pattern would treat any caret(^) as line break.

  • Dot matches newline: Turn this on the make the dot match any character, including line break characters. When off, the dot will match any character except line break characters. This is sometimes called “single line mode” and corresponds with the «(?s)» mode modifier in Perl-style regular expressions.

  • Case insensitive: By default, regular expressions are case sensitive, and «cat» will not match “CAT”. Turn this on to make these match. The corresponding mode modifier is «(?i)».

  • ^$ match at line breaks: When off, the anchors «^» and «$» only match at the start and the end of the string, respectively. When on, they also match after and before line breaks in the string (i.e. at the start and the end of lines). Note that in some regex flavors that lack this option, «^» and «$» always match at line breaks. This option is sometimes called “multi-line mode” and its mode modifier is «(?m)».

  • Free-spacing: Normally, any spaces and line breaks you type into your regular expressions are matched literally. In free-spacing mode, whitespace is ignored and comments can be started with a #. This is sometimes called extended or expanded mode, and the usual modifier is «(?x)».

UPDATE

Looking at you RegEx properly I recognize that there is a missing parenthesis at the end of the pattern and there is an Empty alternative. Change it to:

pcre *myregexp;
const char *error;
int erroroffset;
int offsetcount;
int offsets[(2+1)*3]; // (max_capturing_groups+1)*3
myregexp = pcre_compile("^\\s*(define\\s+[\\w:-]+\\s*\\(class\\s+[\\w:-]+(\\s+inherits\\s+[\\w:-]+)?\\s*\\{|node\\s+\\Z[\\w:.-]+\\Z\\s*\\{)", 0, &error, &erroroffset, NULL);
if (myregexp != NULL) {
    offsetcount = pcre_exec(myregexp, NULL, subject, strlen(subject), 0, 0, offsets, (2+1)*3);
    while (offsetcount > 0) {
        // match offset = offsets[0];
        // match length = offsets[1] - offsets[0];
        if (pcre_get_substring(subject, &offsets, offsetcount, 0, &result) >= 0) {
            // Do something with match we just stored into result
        }
        offsetcount = pcre_exec(myregexp, NULL, subject, strlen(subject), 0, offsets[1], offsets, (2+1)*3);
    } 
} else {
    // Syntax error in the regular expression at erroroffset
}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer

For the record, I used @tripleee's answer and this is my final code:

const char *disambiguate_pp(SourceFile *sourcefile) {
        char *p = ohcount_sourcefile_get_contents(sourcefile);
  char *eof = p + ohcount_sourcefile_get_contents_size(sourcefile);

        /* prepare regular expressions */
        pcre *re;
        const char *error;
        int erroffset;
        re = pcre_compile("^\\s*(define\\s+[\\w:-]+\\s*\\(|class\\s+[\\w:-]+(\\s+inherits\\s+[\\w:-]+)?\\s*{|node\\s+\\'[\\w:\\.-]+\\'\\s*{)",
                          PCRE_MULTILINE, &error, &erroffset, NULL);

        /* regexp for checking for define and class declarations */
        if (pcre_exec(re, NULL, p, mystrnlen(p, 10000), 0, 0, NULL, 0) > -1)            
                return LANG_PUPPET;

        return LANG_PASCAL;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.