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I have a list I need to process. The items are either enabled or disabled. The user can choose whether or not to show disabled items.

So you have cond2 that depends on the items, and cond1 that does not. Here's the dilemma I got into: Should I use cond1 && !cond2 or !(!cond1 || cond2)? Or should I check for the cond2 (show disabled items) before the loop? I also thought (as you will see in the code I put) if I should put the cond2 before cond1, because cond2 is a boolean variable, and with "short-circuits" (lazy evaluation?), it will be faster?

My main concern was speed. If I have many items in the loop, this might be an important change.

This is code that illustrates the options:

// First Option
for (String item : items) {
    doSomethingFirst(item);
    if (isDisabled(item) && !showDisabled) {
        continue;
    }
    doSomethingElse(item);
}

// Second Option
for (String item : items) {
    doSomethingFirst(item);
    if (!(!isDisabled(item) || showDisabled)) {
        continue;
    }
    doSomethingElse(item);
}

// Third Option
if (showDisabled) {
    for (String item : items) {
        doSomethingFirst(item);
        doSomethingElse(item);
    }
} else {
    for (String item : items) {
        doSomethingFirst(item);
        if (isDisabled(item)) {
            continue;
        }
        doSomethingElse(item);
    }
}

So, does the order of isDisabled(item) and showDisabled matter? Should I be checking on things before the loop? Or does the compiler optimize that? (I doubt...)

PS I don't know how I would take measurements to see actual values, if it's relevant please do.

Thanks.

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5  
It doesn't matter. Choose what's most readable. –  delnan May 26 '12 at 9:27
    
@delnan I would have thought the third option is faster, no? But I'd be repeating myself. So readability --; –  jadkik94 May 26 '12 at 9:30
1  
If you did a micro-benchmark, it may end up faster. It may also be slower - e.g. due to CPU caches, JVM optimizations may optimize one loop but neglect the other, inlining may be prevented due to code bloat - so I refuse to guess. However, I'm 99% sure that any difference will be too small for the time you spend thinking about it and doing it (not to mention the extra time spent reading) to pay off. Exceptions exist, but the code for those should not be written by people who have to ask questions like this one ;) –  delnan May 26 '12 at 9:34
    
@delnan Are you saying I'm dumb!? :P Ok. I see so much of this kind of questions, I thought it would really matter. –  jadkik94 May 26 '12 at 9:38
    
Nope, I just have to assume you're not a good candidate for optimizing something that critical - no offense meant :) And yes, such questions pop up quite frequently. Which is depressing, because they are frequently a waste of time (which is precisely what half of the answers say, thankfully). –  delnan May 26 '12 at 9:41
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In Java the expression is evaluated from left to right. With && if the first condition is false, the second one is not executed, with || if the first condition is true, the second one is not executed.

So try to put the condition that can be resolve faster in first place, in your case showDisabled.

For the third example, it looks better because you check the boolean only once but I guess it don't really change performance, a bool comparison is not really costly. You will probably have better improvement to do in other part of your code. (and for the readable aspect it's not my favorite - quite long)

If you want to measure the performance in your case use a profiler for example.

Or add in your code :

long start=System.currentTimeMillis();
//code to analyse
long timeSpent = System.currentTimeMillis()-start

You'll have to put your code in a loop, to make it relevant. And you will probably notice that Java will increase the performance after some loops ;).

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So you are saying Option 1 and 2 are similar as long as the constant is evaluated first? –  jadkik94 May 26 '12 at 9:25
    
The same meaning-wise, but speed-wise too? –  jadkik94 May 26 '12 at 9:28
1  
Yes in this case it's the same thing but the second option is awful to read ;) choose the most readable, if you have not an heavy method invocation in your if statement that can really be influent on performance. –  alain.janinm May 26 '12 at 9:32
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Regarding readability, another good practice is to name functions and variables in their positive state. It's hard to read double negatives. Which one would you rather read?

enabled

Or

!disabled

There are some few cases though that naming things in their negative form makes sense. An example, if you will use them for terminating condition, e.g. end of file. while(!feof(fp))

But in most cases, the norm should be is to name things in their positive form, so reading code has lesser friction.

Let's see how your code looks like in positive form:

// First Option
for (String item : items) {
    doSomethingFirst(item);

    // if (isDisabled(item) && !showDisabled) {

    if (!isEnabled(item) && showEnabled) {
        continue;
    }
    doSomethingElse(item);
}

The readability on that code surely improved.

And even the following become readable too, the double negatives can be avoided, reading code is really merely reading it, not figuring it out too much. I once read an article that suggest that when writing code, it should be very pleasant to read too, he said reading code should not be like reading a detective novel. Reading double negatives code is like reading and deciphering a detective novel.

// Second Option
for (String item : items) {
    doSomethingFirst(item);

    // if (!(!isDisabled(item) || showDisabled)) {

    // You can now avoid double negatives
    if (!( isEnabled(item) || !showEnabled )) {
        continue;
    }
    doSomethingElse(item);
}

In fact, the following is not merely double negative, it's a triple one:

if (!(!isDisabled(item)

  1. isDisabled
  2. !isDisabled
  3. !(!isDisabled

It will take a two-pass read, or even a three-pass before you can decipher what's the intent of that code

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+1. Good point, thanks. –  jadkik94 May 26 '12 at 10:16
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As always with these types of questions, you should measure this to determine if this itself is your bottleneck. If it is, then I would measure the alternatives. I suspect for the above scenario that it will make next to no difference for your alternatives, especially since you'll likely be doing something much more heavyweight with the list entries (displaying them? writing them to a db or file?)

The simplest way to measure this is to generate a sizable list, record the time (say, via System.currentTimeMillis()) before you process, process, and then record the ms (or seconds) taken.

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1  
Actually I'm afraid isDisabled might be slow... which is the condition itself... I'll try making measurements. –  jadkik94 May 26 '12 at 9:27
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Should I use cond1 && !cond2 or !(!cond1 || cond2)? Or should I check for the cond2 (show disabled items) before the loop?

Whatever expresses your thoughts best, i.e. whatever is more readable.

My main concern was speed.

Writing speed? Refactoring speed? Compilation speed? Development speed? Reading and understanding speed? Debugging speed? Execution speed?

You can't have all at once. In no language.

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Execution I thought... nevermind. –  jadkik94 May 26 '12 at 9:36
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I will go for the option 1, and just reverse switch

isDisabled(item) && !showDisabled

with

!showDisabled && isDisabled(item)

If isDisabled(...) is as slow as you say it is better to test the faster case first. Now compared to the other option this is the most explicit and readable:

  • We do something is done for all items
  • we skip for items which validate some test
  • we do something for all other items.

It will be difficult to do more explicit. And the 3rd option is plain ugly.

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