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in my switch i want the cases to go from 0 to the (number_of_cases-1), without writing the numbers myself. So that if i delete one case block in the middle, the following cases would renumber (decrement by 1), so that the switch again is from (0..caseNo-1).

Like this (of course it wont compile, as the i++ arent known compile time):

#include <iostream>

#define ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE 1

void nop(char c){}

int main()
{
 int i=0;
 int var=ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE;

 switch(var)
 {
  case i++: //case 0:
    nop('x');
    break;
  case i++: //case 1:
    nop('y')
    break;
  case i++: //case 2:
    nop('z')
    break;
 }

 //case 1 should have been switched to, nop('y') called.
}

Now i delete the middle case, and without writing anything the last case should change from case 2 to case 1:

#include <iostream>

#define ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE 1

void nop(char c){}

int main()
{
 int i=0;
 int var=ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE;

 switch(var)
 {
  case i++: //case 0:
    nop('x');
    break;
  case i++: //case 1: instead of case 2 like before
    nop('z')
    break;
 }

 //case 1 should have been switched to, nop('z') called,
 // instead of nop('y') like before.
}

So i cant use variables, as they are too variable.. then symbolic constants are too constant, i can do SYMC+1, but no SYMC++. So maybe enums, or some nice macro function? Thanks for any help.

EDIT Thanks for the if-else hint, i just thought that since the case values are known compile-time it would be nicer to use the switch..

And to specify what i want to do: i have a menu char[rows][cols]={"first line","second line"}. I want to map the switch cases to the lines, so that if i want to remove a line from the menu (which decrements following line numbers), i will just remove one sigle case in the rest of the program.

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Why do you need this? What problem are you trying to solve? There is probably a better design. –  Cody Gray May 26 '12 at 11:22
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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is no state-keeping constructs in the preprocessor. However, in C++11 you can use lambdas to express the individual cases, put them in an array, and use in a way similar to a switch with breaks after each case:

function<void()> cases[] = {
    [] () {cout << "quick" << endl; }
,   [] () {cout << "brown" << endl; }
,   [] () {cout << "fox" << endl; }
};
int k = 1;
cases[k](); // <<== This is where the switch happens

Now your array indexes would get "renumbered" automatically every time you remove a case from the middle.

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How about a series of if statements?

 int i=0;
 int var=ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE;

 if (var == i++) {
    nop('x');
 } else if (var == i++) {
    nop('y');
 } else if (var == i++) {
    nop('z');
 }
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This is perhaps silly, but have you considered something like:

#define ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE 1

std::string some_cases = "xyz";
nop(some_cases[ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE]);

std::string some_other_cases = "xz";
nop(some_other_cases[ALWAYS_SECOND_CASE]);

std::map comes to mind, too.

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Ah i see i used a bad example program, im not really deciding on chars there, should have been case 0: x(); case1: y(); .. –  Jakub Fojtik May 26 '12 at 11:31
    
I still think an associative container would be fit for what you're trying to do. On what exactly are you switching, strings? –  jrok May 26 '12 at 11:35
    
On ints, the line numbers in a menu of cstrings. So case 1: has to always map to second cstring in the menu. –  Jakub Fojtik May 26 '12 at 11:36
    
So integers is what you're getting as an input from user? –  jrok May 26 '12 at 11:39
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I don't fully understand what you want to do, but it's clear that you simply shouldn't use switch; it's not meant for the logic you're trying to implement.

You probably instead a series of if(...) else if (...) statements.

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I think the Boost Preprocessor library provides the macros you need to generate your switch statement at compile time. I don't have access to a compiler right to check my code below, but if it doesn't compile it should be very close to something that will solve your problem.

#include <boost/preprocessor/tuple/elem.hpp>
#include <boost/preprocessor/tuple/size.hpp>

#include <boost/preprocessor/repetition/for.hpp>
#include <boost/preprocessor/arithmetic/inc.hpp>
#include <boost/preprocessor/comparison/not_equal.hpp>

#define OPS (x, y, z)
#define NOPS BOOST_PP_TUPLE_SIZE(OPS)

#define PRED(r, state) BOOST_PP_NOT_EQUAL( \
    BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 0, state) \
  , BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 1, state) \
)

#define OP(r, state) ( \
    BOOST_PP_INC(BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 0, state)) \
  , BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 1, state) \
)

#define MACRO(r, state) \
    case BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 0, state): \
        BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(NOPS, BOOST_PP_TUPLE_ELEM(2, 0, state), OPS)(); \
        break;

void x() { }
void y() { }
void z() { }

main() {
    int i = 0;

    switch(i) {
        BOOST_PP_FOR((0, NOPS), PRED, OP, MACRO)
    }
}

Whenever you want to add or remove an operation, just modify the definition of OPS and the case values should automatically renumber themselves. I know some people don't like using the preprocessor, but some of the things it can do are pretty amazing.

Update: I have access to a compile again and I verified that the code above works as advertised. However, it requires Boost 1.49 and you must include -DBOOST_PP_VARIADICS on your compile line.

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