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I have been using this /\(\s*([^)]+?)\s*\)/ regex to remove outer brackets with PHP preg_replace function (Read more in my previous question Regex to match any character except trailing spaces).

This works fine when there is only one pair of brackets, but problem is when there is more, for example ( test1 t3() test2) becomes test1 t3( test2) instead test1 t3() test2.

I am aware of regex limitations, but it would be nice if I could just make it not matching anything if there is more then one pair of brackets.

So, example behavior is good enough:

( test1 test2 ) => test1 test2

( test1 t3() test2 ) => (test1 t3() test2)

EDIT:

I would like to keep trimming trailing white spaces inside removed brackets.

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You should add trailing whitespace to the examples and mention you don't want it. Otherwise you are gonna have to make a third question when you realize the solution you accepted doesn't work with trailing whitespace :P –  Esailija May 26 '12 at 13:11
    
I just did that :) –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 13:32
    
I edited the examples so people can see if their code fails on that requirement simply from trying the examples. Why do you need to retain the outer parentheses if there is inner parentheses? –  Esailija May 26 '12 at 13:34
    
Because this regex is just a part of bigger one, I just wanted to keep things simple and ask for this bracket part. Removing brackets if there are brackets before/after can make output string syntaxly invalid. –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 14:21
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use this recursive regex based code that will work with nested brackets also. Only condition is that brackets should be balanced.

$arr = array('Foo ( test1 test2 )', 'Bar ( test1 t3() test2 )', 'Baz ((("Fdsfds")))');
foreach($arr as $str)
   echo "'$str' => " . 
         preg_replace('/ \( \s* ( ( [^()]*? | (?R) )* ) \s* \) /x', '$1', $str) . "\n";

OUTPUT:

'Foo ( test1 test2 )' => 'Foo test1 test2'
'Bar ( test1 t3() test2 )' => 'Bar test1 t3() test2'
'Baz ((("Fdsfds")))' => 'Baz (("Fdsfds"))'
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, this is interesting. Can you explain | (?R) part please? Can it be applied multi-line /m? Please also note that for ( test1 t3() test2 ) it leaves trailing space. Thanks. –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 15:23
    
Here is a great tutorial on recursive regex in PHP: asiteaboutnothing.net/regexp/regex-recursion.html and it can work wtth /m as well. I will rework the regex to remove trailing space when I get to my computer in couple of hours. –  anubhava May 26 '12 at 16:10
    
Thanks, I'm reading it now. I'm not sure why it does not remove trailing space when it has \s* at the end. One question, is it possible to apply recursion only on one part of regex, and not from the beggining, so I can match keyword ( test1 t3() test2 ) => keyword test1 t3() test2? –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 17:01
    
@umpirsky: Please check the edited answer. It is not leaving trailing space anymore and as you can see 'Bar ( test1 t3() test2 )' => 'Bar test1 t3() test2' that keyword before parenthesis is also being preserved. –  anubhava May 26 '12 at 19:33
    
This is very cool, thanks. –  umpirsky May 27 '12 at 0:33
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Try this

$result = preg_replace('/\(([^)(]+)\)/', '$1', $subject);

Update

\(([^\)\(]+)\)(?=[^\(]+\()

RegEx explanation

"
\(            # Match the character “(” literally
(             # Match the regular expression below and capture its match into backreference number 1
   [^\)\(]       # Match a single character NOT present in the list below
                    # A ) character
                    # A ( character
      +             # Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
)
\)            # Match the character “)” literally
(?=           # Assert that the regex below can be matched, starting at this position (positive lookahead)
   [^\(]         # Match any character that is NOT a ( character
      +             # Between one and unlimited times, as many times as possible, giving back as needed (greedy)
   \(            # Match the character “(” literally
)
"
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For ( test1 t3(t4) test2) it returns ( test1 t3t4 test2). Thanks. –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 13:02
    
@umpirsky:See my updated answer. –  Cylian May 26 '12 at 13:05
    
This is ok, but is missing one thing that I didn't mention in this question, but is working with my original regex /(\s*([^)]+?)\s*)/ and that is trimming trailing white spaces inside removed brackets. –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 13:29
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You may want this (As I guess it is what you want originally):

$result = preg_replace('/\(\s*(.+)\s*\)/', '$1', $subject);

This would get

"(test1 test2)" => "test1 test2"
"(test1 t3() test2)" => "test1 t3() test2"
"( test1 t3(t4) test2)" => "test1 t3(t4) test2"
share|improve this answer
    
I think OP likes retain parentheses for last two cases. –  Cylian May 26 '12 at 13:13
    
@Cylian OP says "I am aware of regex limitations, but it would be nice if I could just make it not matching anything if there is more then one pair of brackets." So I guess it would be better if I understood his "better" need correctly. If OP still want to retain them after seen this answer, I would delete it myself :-P –  Felix Yan May 26 '12 at 13:16
    
I'm interested in both solutions. This is ok, but is missing one thing that I didn't mention in this question, but is working with my original regex /\(\s*([^)]+?)\s*\)/ and that is trimming trailing white spaces inside removed brackets. –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 13:29
    
@umpirsky This one DOES trim trailing white spaces, as you can see, I've updated my answer to add some quotation marks. –  Felix Yan May 26 '12 at 13:32
    
For ( test1 test2 ) it returns test1 test2 . Please note that there is space at the end. Thanks. –  umpirsky May 26 '12 at 13:36
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