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What is the simplest way to reverse this ArrayList?

ArrayList aList = new ArrayList();

//Add elements to ArrayList object
aList.add("1");
aList.add("2");
aList.add("3");
aList.add("4");
aList.add("5");

while (aList.listIterator().hasPrevious())
  Log.d("reverse", "" + aList.listIterator().previous());
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up vote 344 down vote accepted

Try this (Reference):

ArrayList aList = new ArrayList();
//Add elements to ArrayList object
aList.add("1");
aList.add("2");
aList.add("3");
aList.add("4");
aList.add("5");
Collections.reverse(aList);
System.out.println("After Reverse Order, ArrayList Contains : " + aList);
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23  
The simplest way. just one line.. – Agarwal Shankar May 26 '12 at 13:14
1  
@AgarwalShankar i am getting an error required ArrayList found void. Am i missing something. – Sagar Devanga Jan 5 '15 at 6:52
    
@SagarDevanga The list is reversed in place, not returned. – Carcigenicate May 30 '15 at 20:24

Not the simplest way but if you're a fan of recursion you might be interested in the following method to reverse an ArrayList:

public ArrayList<Object> reverse(ArrayList<Object> list) {
    if(list.size() > 1) {                   
        Object value = list.remove(0);
        reverse(list);
        list.add(value);
    }
    return list;
}

Or non-recursively:

public ArrayList<Object> reverse(ArrayList<Object> list) {
    for(int i = 0, j = list.size() - 1; i < j; i++) {
        list.add(i, list.remove(j));
    }
    return list;
}
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I might be wrong, but in your non-recursive example, doesn't int j not get updated with each iteration? You initialize it to j = list.size() - 1 but I don't think that initialization section of the for loop gets updated with each iteration does it? – Tony Chan Nov 7 '14 at 2:26
    
@Turbo j doesn't need to be updated with each iteration. It is initialized to the last index of the ArrayList and is used to access the last element. Inside the for loop the last element is removed and inserted into index i; i is incremented until it reaches the next to last position in the ArrayList. – todd Nov 7 '14 at 2:44
    
Yes, but on the second iteration, won't you get an IndexOutOfBoundsException since you're trying to access j (the last index of the original ArrayList) but you already removed the object at that index? – Tony Chan Nov 7 '14 at 2:51
    
Sorry, just ran the code, definitely works. I forgot that add() pushes the other elements down the array, so the array stays a constant size essentially. Interesting solutions, thanks! – Tony Chan Nov 7 '14 at 3:01
    
Also, just curious but how did you come up with the recursive method? I don't think that's something I would normally think of. – Tony Chan Nov 7 '14 at 3:08

A little more readable :)

public static <T> ArrayList<T> reverse(ArrayList<T> list) {
    int length = list.size();
    ArrayList<T> result = new ArrayList<T>(length);

    for (int i = length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
        result.add(list.get(i));
    }

    return result;
}
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