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Is there a way to make a variable non-inheritable in python? Like in the following example: B is a subclass of A, but I want it to have its own SIZE value.

Could I get an Error to be raised (on __init__ or on getsize()) if B doesn't override SIZE?

class A:
   SIZE = 5
   def getsize(self): return self.SIZE

class B(A): pass

Edit: ... while inheriting the getsize() method...?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want to make absolutely sure that subclasses of A override SIZE, you could use a metaclass for A that will raise an error when a subclass does not override it (note that A is a new-style class here):

class ClassWithSize(type):
    def __init__(cls, name, bases, attrs):
        if 'SIZE' not in attrs:
            raise NotImplementedError('The "%s" class does not implement a "SIZE" attribute' % name)
        super(ClassWithSize, cls).__init__(name, bases, attrs)

class A(object):
    __metaclass__ = ClassWithSize

    SIZE = 5
    def getsize(self):
        return self.SIZE

class B(A):
    SIZE = 6

class C(A):
    pass

When you put the above in a module and attempt to import it, an exception will be raised when the import reaches the C class implementation.

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Thanks! I see... This should do the job, but it doesn't look particularly elegant... –  Emma Jul 2 '09 at 21:42
    
So what you wanted is to enforce that subclasses set their own value for the class attribute and not allow them to delegate to the value set by class A? –  Mark Roddy Jul 2 '09 at 21:58
    
Yeah, I must admit it's kind of hackish, messing with metaclasses has this eerie, black magic aura about it –  Steef Jul 2 '09 at 22:03
3  
@Emma: it doesn't look elegant because -- generally -- it's not necessary. We're all adults. Simply look at the subclass code and be sure it overrides SIZE. Much simpler and more elegant to look at the code. –  S.Lott Jul 2 '09 at 22:59
    
@S.Lott Thanks! In my case there are lots of subclasses to check, that is why I didn't want to go through the code and check manually. –  Emma Jul 9 '09 at 18:26

Use a double-underscore prefix:

(Double-underscore solution deleted after Emma's clarification)

OK, you can do it like this:

class A:
    SIZE = 5
    def __init__(self):
        if self.__class__ != A:
            del self.SIZE

    def getsize(self):
        return self.SIZE

class B(A):
    pass

a = A()
print a.getsize()
# Prints 5

b = B()
print b.getsize()
# AttributeError: B instance has no attribute 'SIZE'
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I wanted to inherit the method, but not the variable. It would be weird to copy and paste the same method to all the subclasses :( –  Emma Jul 2 '09 at 21:31
    
... But then, even if I specify SIZE in B, it still raises the same AttributeError: B instance has no attribute 'SIZE'. –  Emma Jul 2 '09 at 21:50
    
I guess there's just no elegant way to do it. Steef's solution works, but it looks kinda ...mmm... hacky. –  Emma Jul 2 '09 at 21:54
    
@RichieHindle In your example class B does not need its own init method. The code: b=B() calls the one from A anyway. –  quamrana Jul 2 '09 at 22:51
    
@quamrana: Good point - fixed. –  RichieHindle Jul 2 '09 at 22:54

If metaclasses scare you (and I sympathize with that attitude!-), a descriptor could work -- you don't even have to make your custom descriptor (though that's easy enough), a plain good old property could work fine too:

class A(object):

  @property
  def SIZE(self):
    if type(self) is not A:
      raise AttributeError("Class %s MUST explicitly define SIZE!" % 
                            type(self).__name__)

  def getsize(self):
    return self.SIZE

Of course, this way you'll get the error only when an instance of a subclass of A which doesn't override SIZE actually tries to use self.SIZE (the metaclass approach has the advantage of giving the error earlier, when an errant subclass of A is created).

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The only approach that I can add is to use hasattr(self.__class__, 'SIZE') in the implementation of getsize() and toss an exception if the attribute is not found. Something like:

class A:
   SIZE = 5
   def getsize(self):
     klass = self.__class__
     if hasattr(klass, 'SIZE') and 'SIZE' in klass.__dict__:
       return self.SIZE
     raise NotImplementedError('SIZE is not defined in ' + klass.__name__)

There is some magic still missing since the derived class could define a method named SIZE and getsize wouldn't detect it. You can probably do some type(klass.SIZE) magic to filter this out if you want to.

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You can always just override it like this:

class B(A):  
  SIZE = 6
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I just want to make sure that all subclasses of A override it. (That there is no way they can inherit the variable) –  Emma Jul 2 '09 at 21:21

It sounds like what you want is a private variable. In which case this is what you need to do:

class A:
    __SIZE = 5
    def getsize(self): 
        return self.__SIZE

    def setsize(self,newsize):
        self.__SIZE=newsize

class B(A): 
    pass
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Hi Mark, No, that's not what I want. With your code, b = B() print b.getsize() # prints 5 I don't want B to be able to access the __SIZE variable in A. –  Emma Jul 2 '09 at 21:46

Another approach might be to get classes A and B to inherit from a third class instead of one from the other:

class X:
    def getsize(self):
        return self.SIZE
class A(X):
    SIZE = 5

class B(X): pass

a = A()
print a.getsize()
# Prints 5

b = B()
print b.getsize()
# AttributeError: B instance has no attribute 'SIZE'
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Another common idiom is to use NotImplemented. Think of it as the middle ground between metaclass enforcement and mere documentation.

class A:
   SIZE = NotImplemented

Now if a subclass forgets to override SIZE, the runtime errors will be immediate and obvious.

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