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I have a task in Linux and I can't get it work.

I have a program that receives a text file as parameter. It then creates a child process using fork() and sends to the child process, line by line the content of the text file received as parameter. The child process needs to count the lines and return to the parent process the number of lines received.

This is what I have until now, but somewhat the child process does not receive all the lines. For my test I used a text file with 9 lines. The parent sent 9 lines as strings but the child process received only 2 or 3 of them.

What am I doing wrong?

#include <stdio.h>      
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{  
  char string[80];
  char readbuffer[80];
  int pid, p[2];
  FILE *fp;
  int i=0;
  if(argc != 2)
  {
    printf("Syntax: %s [file_name]\n", argv[0]);
    return 0;    
  }
  fp = fopen(argv[1], "r");
  if(!fp) 
  {    
    printf("Error: File '%s' does not exist.\n", argv[1]);
    return 0;
  }
  if(pipe(p) == -1)
  {
    printf("Error: Creating pipe failed.\n");
    exit(0);
  } 
  // creates the child process
  if((pid=fork()) == -1)
  {
   printf("Error: Child process could not be created.\n");
    exit(0);
  }  

  /* Main process */
  if (pid) 
  { 
    // close the read
    close(p[0]);    
    while(fgets(string,sizeof(string),fp) != NULL)
    {                
       write(p[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));
       printf("%s\n",string);
    } 

    // close the write
    close(p[1]);
    wait(0);
  }

  // child process
  else 
  {   
    // close the write
    close(p[1]); 

    while(read(p[0],readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer)) != 0) 
    {
      printf("Received string: %s\n", readbuffer);    
    }

    // close the read
    close(p[0]); 
  } 
  fclose(fp);       
}
share|improve this question
1  
Is this homework? If so, please add the appropriate tag. Anyway, here's a hint: read doesn't stop reading if there's a '\0' in the data stream. –  celtschk May 26 '12 at 15:06
1  
Did the child process receive "2 or 3 lines" or did its read() return "2 or 3 times"? Those are different scenarios. I'm willing to bet it's the latter. –  chrisaycock May 26 '12 at 15:10

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A pipe is a unidirectional interprocess communication channel. You have to create 2 pipes, one to speak to the child process, the other to read data back.

Remember to close the unused side of the pipe on both processes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. I have created 2 pipes and everything works now. –  alexandrudicu May 27 '12 at 19:25

You're not counting the number of lines, you're counting the number of times read(2) returns.

When using pipes, read(2) will pull as much data as possible from the pipe: min(pipe_available, space_available). It doesn't care for newlines, 0 bytes etc. Simple tricks to make it work:

  • Use a loop to walk readbuffer and look for \n
  • Use fdopen + fgets (I have a feeling this is probably flawed)
share|improve this answer
    
His code as written doesn't send '\n' to the child process. He has to look for '\0'. –  celtschk May 26 '12 at 15:15
    
@celtschk Doesn't fgets leave the \n in ? I think it does No additional characters are read after a new-line character (which is retained) or after end-of-file. - 7.21.7.2 –  cnicutar May 26 '12 at 15:16
    
Oops, you're right. I wasn't aware that fgets differs from gets in this respect (who invented that interface!?) –  celtschk May 26 '12 at 15:19
    
@celtschk I didn't even know gets didn't include the newline! Ha, nice find! –  cnicutar May 26 '12 at 15:20

look into manpage of pipe ( man 2 pipe ), the program you're trying to write is as an example there, compare it with yours :)

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You are sending the null terminator to the other process:

   write(p[1], string, (strlen(string)+1));

That makes the result confusing because when you print what you've received, you only see up to the null terminator.

If you do this instead:

   write(p[1], string, strlen(string));

you should get what you expect.

share|improve this answer

Thank you for your suggestions. This is what I have now and it works but how to send the answer back to the parent ? Because the parent process needs the answer.

if (pid) /* Main process */
  { 
    /* Close the read */
    close(p[0]);    
    while(fgets(string,sizeof(string),fp) != NULL)
    {   
    write(p[1], string, (strlen(string)));    
    }    
    /* Close the write */
    close(p[1]);
    wait(0);
    printf("\nMain process with PID=%d has terminated succesfully.\n", getpid());
   }
   else /* Child process */
   {   
     /* Close the write */
     close(p[1]);    
     while( read(p[0], readbuffer, sizeof(readbuffer)) > 0) 
     {
       int j=0;
       for(j; j<sizeof(readbuffer); j++)
       {    
       if (readbuffer[j] == '\n')
       { 
          i++;    
       }
        }  
      }
      /* Close the read */
      close(p[0]); 
      printf("\nChild process with PID=%d has terminated succesfully.\nChild process received %d lines from the parent process.\n",getpid(), i);
    } 
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