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I just realized something crazy, which I assumed to be completely impossible : when deserializing an object, the DataContractSerializer doesn't call the constructor !

Take this class, for instance :

[DataContract]
public class Book
{
    public Book()
    { // breakpoint here
    }

    [DataMember(Order = 0)]
    public string Title { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 1)]
    public string Author { get; set; }
    [DataMember(Order = 2)]
    public string Summary { get; set; }
}

When I deserialize an object of that class, the breakpoint is not hit. I have absolutely no idea how it is possible, since it is the only constructor for this object !

I assumed that perhaps an additional constructor was generated by the compiler because of the DataContract attribute, but I couldn't find it through reflection...

So, what I'd like to know is this : how could an instance of my class be created without the constructor being called ??

NOTE: I know that I can use the OnDeserializing attribute to initialize my object when deserialization begins, this is not the subject of my question.

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2  
or the "OnDeserialized", when the object is done deserializing, to fill in the missing fields. –  marc_s Jul 2 '09 at 21:21
1  
This question crossed my mind too: stackoverflow.com/questions/178645/… –  Drew Noakes Aug 24 '09 at 19:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 75 down vote accepted

DataContractSerializer (like BinaryFormatter) doesn't use any constructor. It creates the object as empty memory.

For example:

    Type type = typeof(Customer);
    object obj = System.Runtime.Serialization.
        FormatterServices.GetUninitializedObject(type);

The assumption is that the deserialization process (or callbacks if necessary) will fully initialize it.

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2  
+1 - YUP, mind-boggling at first, but that's the way it is! –  marc_s Jul 2 '09 at 21:20
    
This is not entirely true (or could be understood wrong): the DataContractSerializer will create a chunk of memory big enough to hold the object, and then it will fill in those fields it knows about from the stream it's deserializing from - so after deserialization, you do have a valid object with the values filled in from the stream it's been deserialized from (it's not all empty after deserialization) –  marc_s Jul 2 '09 at 21:26
    
Thanks Marc ! I was completely unaware of that GetUninitializedObject method... –  Thomas Levesque Jul 2 '09 at 21:27
36  
This is CHEATING !! –  Cheeso Aug 24 '09 at 21:08
3  
I am just not sure why this functionality would ever be desired. Constructors are for state initialization. Bypassing that just serves no purpose at all. The no-argument constructor should be allowed to setup state whether or not it is about to be deserialized. If they wanted a specific optimization, there is the StreamingContext constructor. –  Mranz Dec 5 '11 at 16:15

There are some scenario's that wouldn’t be possible without this behavior. Think of the following:

1) You have an object that has one constructor that sets the new instance to an "initialized" state. Then some methods are called on that instance, that bring it in a "processed" state. You don’t want to create new objects having the "processed" state, but you still want de serialize / deserialize the instance.

2) You created a class with a private constructor and some static properties to control a small set of allowed constructor parameters. Now you can still serialize / deserialize them.

XmlSerializer has the behavior you expected. I have had a some problems with the XmlSerializer because it DOES need a default constructor. Related to that, sometimes it makes sense to have private property setters. But the XmlSerializer also needs public getter and setter on properties in order to serialize / deserialize.

I think of the DataContractSerializer / BinaryFormatter behavior like suspending the state of an instance during serialization and resuming during deserialization. In other words, the instances are not “constructed” but “restored” to an earlier state.

As you already mentioned, the [OnDeserializing] attribute makes it possible to keep non serialized data in sync.

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I would not say that it "suspend the state of an instance" because I just hit a problem where my DataMember was using INotifyPropertyChanged and while the constructor is not called, it will trigger the NotifyPropertyChanged so the behavior will not be suspended. –  ForceMagic Dec 11 '13 at 21:31

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