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I want to get the size (in bytes) of struct testB here:

struct testA
{
    int x;
};
struct testB
{
    std::string guid;
    testA userData;
};

I can get the size like this but it's stupid:

int testA::size()
{
    return sizeof(testA);
}
int testB::size()
{
    return guid.size()*sizeof(TCHAR) + userData.size();
}

Are there simpler solutions?

Ps: the problem at hand is like this:

I want to story an object to database, so when my application crashes, I can get my data back. So I used sqlite, and save all the members of the struct in seperate rows. Everything goes fine, except that I have a member who hold the binary string of a Protobuf message, which can't be inserted into the database because it will make the SQL sentence invalid.

So I come to 2 solutions:

1 serialize the protobuf message into a json/XML text, which seems to be tedious to me

2 dump all the content into the db using sqlite3_bind_blob whose third param is the size of the blob data in bytes, so the question is : how to get the size of the struct (which is quite complicated)?

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1  
Why do you need this? It seems you want to measure the memory consumed by an object, but why? –  Niklas B. May 26 '12 at 15:11
    
To extend what Niklas is saying: the size of an object can mean different things. For example, if you want to know how many of these objects can fit into a particular amount of memory, then that is a tricky calculation. –  Vaughn Cato May 26 '12 at 15:18
    
@NiklasB. I want to store the object to a sqlite database, so I have to use sqlite3_bind_blob, which requires the size of the blob data in bytes. –  YoungLearner May 26 '12 at 15:26
    
Not only that, but hacking std::string to put data into a particular block of memory is even trickier. If the project were that serious, you would probably be using binary uint8_t guid[16] or a fixed char guid[36]… since the string size will never vary! –  Potatoswatter May 26 '12 at 15:27
    
@YoungLearner: And once you have figured out the size, what are you going to do? What I'm trying to say is that you need a custom binary format to store you string. –  Niklas B. May 26 '12 at 15:28
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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
sizeof (testB) // how many bytes are allocated for testB object itself

is possibly what you want, or

sizeof (testB) + guid.capacity() // also include heap allocation for string

Without some kind of description of the problem at hand, there's no way to come to a specific conclusion.

The most obvious use for this information would be to evaluate program memory usage. This strategy isn't appropriate for that. Use a profiler or whatever debugging tools are available on your platform to report the number and total size of allocations while running real-world test cases. For example, Valgrind should do this.

EDIT: You want to pass the size to sqlite_bind_blob, which takes a void * pointer to unformatted memory and a number of bytes to read from that pointer.

An interface accepting a void * will not be aware of any data structures such as implemented by the STL. The void * needs to come from a flat structure with no pointers and a very stable binary format. The C++ terminology is "standard layout" and the simplest thing is not to use any C++ features at all.

In this case, you could write something like

struct testB
{
    char guid[ 36 ]; // ASCII representation of hex of GUID
    testA userData;
};

But really the best thing would be to put the GUID in another database column outside this blob. The database might optimize storage of GUIDs, and you're likely to want to look up records by GUID as well.

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This is a long story. I want to story an object to database, so when my application crashes, I can get my data back. So I used sqlite, and get all the members of the struct in seperate row. Everything goes fine, except that I have a member who hold the binary string of a Protobuf message, which can't be inserted into the database because it will make the SQL sentence invalid. –  YoungLearner May 26 '12 at 15:35
    
So I come to 2 solutions: 1 serialize the protobuf message into a json/XML text, which seems to be tedious to me 2 dump all the content into the db using sqlite3_bind_blob whose third param is the size of the blob data in bytes so the question is : how to get the size of the struct (which is quite complicated)? –  YoungLearner May 26 '12 at 15:35
3  
You should debug your application so it doesn't crash. That is by far the best use of your time. Do not add layers of paper trying to patch over the problems. If you want to add serialization, you should do it the right way, using text or appropriately encoded binary. It only seems tedious because it's going off on a tangent, instead of solving the real problem. –  Potatoswatter May 26 '12 at 15:39
    
Thank you for your advice. I need serialization, so I'd better consider encoded binary, for there may be much data. Any suggestion for encoded binary? Now that I have used protobuf messages in my project, I'm considering using it to do the encoding, your opinion? –  YoungLearner May 26 '12 at 15:51
    
Thank you for your advice of "to put the GUID in another database column outside this blob", that's what I should have done. –  YoungLearner May 26 '12 at 16:07
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