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I am trying to update the date object through the various j/script native date object methods, but are confused why the change appears to be applied to all date objects on the page.

I had originally found a post recommending adding a method to the date prototype, but this changed all date ojects. I then simplified and found both dates are still updating. I would appreciate any advice on how to prevent this. What I want is a starTime and an endTime through something that looks a little like this. (NOTE: I will eventually turn into a function).

time1 = new Date();
alert(time1);//returns Sat May 26 11:15:41 EDT 2012
time2=time1;
time2.setMinutes(time2.getMinutes()+10);
alert(time1); //returns Sat May 26 11:25:41 EDT 2012
alert(time2);//returns Sat May 26 11:25:41 EDT 20112  

Question: why is date2=date1 if I only update date2.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you do this:

time2=time1;

...you're not creating a new Date object, you're just pointing to the date object from two separate variables. There's only one object, so naturally any changes you make to it are apparent regardless of which variable you look through.

Let's throw some ASCII-art at it:

time1 = new Date();

That gives us:

+-------+
+ time1 +
+-------+                 +---------------+
| value |---------------->| a Date object |
+-------+                 +---------------+

Now when you do:

time2=time1;

We have

+-------+
+ time1 |
+-------+
| value |------+
+-------+      |          +---------------+
               +--------->| a Date object |
               |          +---------------+
+-------+      |
+ time2 |      |
+-------+      |
| value |------+
+-------+

The value of the time1 and time2 variables is a reference to the Date object, not a copy of it. (All objects work this way.) You can think of an object reference as like a memory address of where to find the object in memory. (What it actually is depends on the implementation.)

This is different from primitives, where the value of the variable actually contains the primitive's data, e.g.:

var n = 42;

Results in

+-----------+
+     n     |
+-----------+
| value: 42 |
+-----------+

(In theory. In fact, string "primitives" will behave as though that's true, but in reality probably are stored more like objects. Doesn't matter, strings are immutable and == and === for string primitives compares their content, so we can't really tell the difference and we can pretend that they're actually contained by the variable. [Just to really be confusing: JavaScript also has Number and String objects, which behave like objects.])


Re your question below:

In the interim, what is the most efficient way to create a second javascript object identical to a preexisting one?

There is no generic "clone" operation for JavaScript objects, so the answer varies by object. Some objects you don't need to clone, because they're immutable (can't be changed) and so don't need cloning (String objects, for instance).

To clone a date, it's easy:

time2 = new Date(time1);

Or the slightly more efficient:

time2 = new Date(+time1);

(Because the + tells the time1 object to convert itself to a number, and then the Date constructor uses that number. Without it, the time1 object would be asked to convert itself to a string, and then the Date constructor would parse that string. Still works, but going via the number is a micro- and almost certainly premature optimization — and one that might interfere with any hidden optimization an engine might want to use. So I'd just go with time2 = new Date(time1);.)

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-Thanks for the response. I will have to do some more reading on javascript ojects. In the interim, what is the most efficient way to create a second javascript object identical to a preexisting one? –  Greg.Forbes May 26 '12 at 15:26
    
@Fooksie that depends on the type of object, but with dates you can do time2 = new Date(+time1); –  Esailija May 26 '12 at 15:27
    
@Fooksie stackoverflow.com/a/10767467/139010 –  Matt Ball May 26 '12 at 15:27
    
@Fooksie: See edit (new stuff at end). –  T.J. Crowder May 26 '12 at 15:29
1  
@Esailija: You'd think that, wouldn't you? Except that the Date constructor calls ToPrimitive with no hint. ToPrimitive calls [[DefaultValue]] passing on the lack-of-hint, and the default hint for Date (unlike everything else) is String, not Number. Of course, an implementation would be free to optimize... And as you say, not that it matters. –  T.J. Crowder May 26 '12 at 15:52

The two answers posted so far are correct. The solution is to create a second date that uses the same internal millisecond value, copied from the first:

var time1 = new Date();
var time2 = new Date(time1.getTime());

Now you've got two distinct date instances that you can manipulate independently of one another.

var time1 = new Date();
alert(time1); // Sat May 26 2012 11:26:16 GMT-0400 (EDT)
var time2 = new Date(time1.getTime());
time2.setMinutes(time2.getMinutes()+10);
alert(time1); // Sat May 26 2012 11:26:16 GMT-0400 (EDT)
alert(time2); // Sat May 26 2012 11:36:16 GMT-0400 (EDT)

More reading: Date – MDN.

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This answers my question, thanks for the help Matt. –  Greg.Forbes May 26 '12 at 15:28
1  
It appears you can clone date object just by passing it directly to date constructor –  Esailija May 26 '12 at 15:41

When you do this:

time1 = new Date();  // <-- creates a new Date object
time2 = time1;       // <-- time2 gets passed a reference to the time1 object
                     //     making them effectively the same

You create a Date object on the first line, but the second line does not create another Date object, it only points or references the Date object that was already created. This is a common feature in many object oriented programming languages.

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