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Im making a game in java and need to be able to make a loop that does something like this:

first pass through loop:

for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    example.print(0);
}

second pass:

for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    example.print(0);
    example.print(1);
}

and so on with another example.print() added each time.

In order for the program to work correctly, each "example.print()" has to physically be there is the code. Any ideas?

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1  
"In order for the program to work correctly, each "example.print()" has to physically be there is the code." What does this mean? –  Laurence Gonsalves May 26 '12 at 17:13
    
It's nice to see people overcoming their urge to rage against the newbies. Though, you should've researched this more. –  keyser May 26 '12 at 17:22
    
@LaurenceGonsalves Language mangling aside, the notion of physical code is a bit troubling ;) –  Tim May 26 '12 at 17:23
    
sorry for my poor communication skills. i just meant physically as in "example.print(0) example.print(1)" instead of "example.print(i)". each part is actually there in the code. –  user1419268 May 27 '12 at 0:38
    
@user1419268 Can you explain why each one has to be "actually there in the code"? –  Laurence Gonsalves May 27 '12 at 6:32

6 Answers 6

Sounds like you want nested loops:

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    for (int j = 0; j < 5; j++) {
        example.print(i + j); // This will need adjusting
    }
}

Notes:

  • You'll want to adjust the i + j part as necessary to get the desired output. You didn't say what should happen when we got past the first five. :-)
  • You didn't say how many passes you wanted, so I assumed 5. If you want fewer, change the upper limit of the i loop (the outer one), probably.
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1  
aah i hate it when that happens. I've been coding for so long that I've overlooked such a simple solution! thanks for the help. –  user1419268 May 26 '12 at 17:08
    
@user1419268: :-) we've all done it. If this answered the question, don't forget to mark the answer as "accepted". Details: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/5234/… –  T.J. Crowder May 26 '12 at 17:34
int loopCounter = 0;

for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    for(int k=0; k<loopCounter; k++)example.print(k);
    loopCounter++;
}
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This does not print 0 on the first run, since loopCounter and k are equal. –  David B May 26 '12 at 20:54

My version:

for(int i=0;i<5;i++)
{
    for(int k=0; k<i; k++)
          example.print(k);
}
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1  
But why not ... { for(int k=0; k < i; k++) example.print(k);? You're complicating it the way you do it. –  Marko Topolnik May 26 '12 at 17:15
    
Right I overlooked... double editing :-( Sorry –  TeaOverflow May 26 '12 at 17:19

Try this.

for (int x = 0,y = 0; x < 100; x++,y++) {

        example.print(x + y); // You will need to tweak these values
    }

100 is an assumed value here, for the nos of times the loop will iterate.

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here's my take, *considering the parameter your sending to the print method is what you want it to print

int n=3; //n is the highest param value you want your print method to receive, 
         //here it's just 3

for (int i=0; i<n; i++) {
    for (int j=0; j<(i+1)*5; j++) {
        example.print(j/5);
    }
}
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It's anybody's guess what you mean by "physically there", but I'll give it a shot:

final Example example = new Example();
for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++)
  switch (i) {
    case 4: example.print(i-4);
    case 3: example.print(i-3);
    case 2: example.print(i-2);
    case 1: example.print(i-1);
    case 0: example.print(i-0);
  }
share|improve this answer
    
I think that's what he meant. Not sure why. –  keyser May 26 '12 at 17:22
    
how would i do this if "5" was a variable constantly increasing? –  user1419268 May 26 '12 at 19:53
    
Obviously, a variable whose value changes at runtime will not be able to affect the code that the compiler made beforehand. I should warn you that your entire question is misguided. You should have stated your broader problem: what is the situation that makes you think you want such a monstrosity. –  Marko Topolnik May 26 '12 at 19:58
    
okayy im making a game where blocks fall from the ceiling and when the hit the bottom, they are supposed to stay put and a new block starts falling from the top. I put the x/y coordinates in arraylists and have a call for method to generate another block with new x/y coordinates. In order for an already fallen block to stay on the ground, i need to have the loop that was my original question. I know there must be a much better way to do this, but with only 3 months of experience i dont know it. –  user1419268 May 26 '12 at 20:56
    
The idea was to improve your question, not add a comment. Also, in the comment you still don't motivate your conclusion that you need the thing you are asking for. I' saying this primarily for future reference, as this question has already fallen out of focus on SO and I'm probably the only one still checking it out. –  Marko Topolnik May 27 '12 at 6:01

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