Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am calling sort on an array like this:

new_list = my_array.sort

The error I am getting is:

NoMethodError: undefined method `<=>' for nil:NilClass

How do I handle nil cases for this simple sort?

I initially had a destructive sort call (i.e. sort!) and changed it to the regular sort, but it still throws this error.

Thoughts?

share|improve this question
2  
show one (or more) inputs and the desired output for them or people will have to guess what you want. –  tokland May 26 '12 at 18:14

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, I assume you don't need/want the nils, so...

new_list = my_array.compact.sort
share|improve this answer
    
What will happen if I have one element in 3D array that is nil? Will it remove the entire record? i.e. array = [[2, marcamillion, nil], [[3, Ed, 1986]]. In that case, what will be compacted? I checked the docs but it doesn't talk about multi-dimensional arrays. –  marcamillion May 26 '12 at 17:38

If you want to ignore nils, you can do this:

new_list = my_array.compact.sort

compact copies the array, skipping nil values

share|improve this answer
    
Damn, beaten by 9 seconds :D –  Ed S. May 26 '12 at 17:27
    
This happens :) –  Sergio Tulentsev May 26 '12 at 17:27
    
What will happen if I have one element in 3D array that is nil? Will it remove the entire record? i.e. array = [[2, marcamillion, nil], [[3, Ed, 1986]]. In that case, what will be compacted? I checked the docs but it doesn't talk about multi-dimensional arrays. –  marcamillion May 26 '12 at 17:38
1  
Also, it would have taken you less time to test that situation than to write this comment. –  Sergio Tulentsev May 26 '12 at 17:41
1  
Re-read those comments and see if you could have written them less like a dick. –  marcamillion May 26 '12 at 17:42

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.