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With regard to Memory usage and variable instantiation which is better or is there no difference :

This

for(int i = 0; i < someValue; i++)
{
    Obj foo = new Obj();
    Use foo.....
}

As opposed to:

Obj foo;

for(int i = 0; i < someValue; i++)
{
    foo = new Obj();
    Use foo.....
}
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1  
The first version is better, because it potentially reduces the lifetime of the object. –  nosid May 26 '12 at 18:38
13  
No difference in terms of memory usage. Stop giving importance to such tiny details and focus on the bigger picture! –  Park Young-Bae May 26 '12 at 18:38
2  
Don't try to do the job of the compiler. –  dystroy May 26 '12 at 18:38
    
@Cicada: this is a totally legitimate question –  leonbloy May 26 '12 at 18:54
2  
@nosid Absolutely not true. Even assuming javac did generate different bytecode, the JIT will do liveness analysis. –  Voo May 26 '12 at 18:58
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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

There is no difference. Any potential difference in terms of memory usage would be optimized by the compiler.

If you compile (using javap -c) the two examples and compare the bytecode, you'll find that the bytecode is the same. Of course, this depends on the JVM version. But since this example is so trivial, it's probably safe to assume that neither is more memory efficient than the other.


Example 1:

Code:

public class example1 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
            Object a = new Object();
        }
    }
}

Bytecode:

public class example1 extends java.lang.Object{
public example1();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_1
   2:   iload_1
   3:   bipush  10
   5:   if_icmpge       22
   8:   new     #2; //class java/lang/Object
   11:  dup
   12:  invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   15:  astore_2
   16:  iinc    1, 1
   19:  goto    2
   22:  return
}

Example 2:

Code:

public class example2 {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Object a;
        for (int i=0; i<10; i++) {
            a = new Object();
        }
    }
}

Bytecode:

public class example2 extends java.lang.Object{
public example2();
  Code:
   0:   aload_0
   1:   invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   4:   return

public static void main(java.lang.String[]);
  Code:
   0:   iconst_0
   1:   istore_2
   2:   iload_2
   3:   bipush  10
   5:   if_icmpge       22
   8:   new     #2; //class java/lang/Object
   11:  dup
   12:  invokespecial   #1; //Method java/lang/Object."<init>":()V
   15:  astore_1
   16:  iinc    2, 1
   19:  goto    2
   22:  return
}
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2  
Now This was quick thinking - Kudos –  Aiden Strydom May 26 '12 at 18:47
1  
i would prefer the second one (which declares the variable outside of the loop) , so that for debugging i would see the current value of the variable and that it won't become invisible and visible on each loop iteration. –  android developer May 26 '12 at 21:47
2  
Joshua Bloch (author of Effective Java) would argue otherwise, as described in Item 45: Minimize the scope of local variables. :) –  Alex Lockwood May 26 '12 at 23:11
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With modern JVM both will work the same, also compiler optimization will take make both of them same.

Ignoring compiler optimization and modern JVM, 1st approach is better.

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2  
You compared the 2 scenarios wrongly. By the way, first approach is more readable (no unnecessary object scope). –  Amir Pashazadeh May 26 '12 at 18:44
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There is no difference between your examples, as is pointed out in other answers. But the interestiong question is: if your example is slow, what should you do?

If you want to reduce time spent in allocations/garbage collections in a really performance critical section, consider re-using objects instead of allocating new objects on each iteration.

foo = new Obj();
for(int i = 0; i < someValue; i++)
{
    foo.init(i);
    Use foo.....
}

From java performance tuning (an old book, but the same holds true in modern jvm:s and in the .NET clr)

... objects are expensive to create. Where it is reasonable to reuse the same object, you should do so. You need to be aware of when not to call new. One fairly obvious situation is when you have already used an object and can discard it before you are about to create another object of the same class. You should look at the object and consider whether it is possible to reset the fields and then reuse the object, rather than throw it away and create another. This can be particularly important for objects that are constantly used and discarded

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Reusing objects leads to rarer, but therefore extremely expensive GC runs - collecting young objects is dirt cheap. Often enough that's actually contraproductive on modern JVMs (the Hotspot guys don't generally recommend it afaik) –  Voo May 26 '12 at 20:16
    
In the above example, why would the collection be more expensive? I'm more accustomed to the CLR, where I'm often limited by allocations, especially since in the default GC mode you cannot allocate on one thread if a GC was triggered by another. –  Anders Forsgren May 26 '12 at 20:21
    
You probably want to read up on generational GCs. Yes the CLR is still quite bad wrt parallel GC algorithms, but the same principle applies there as well: Lots of extremely short, cheap young gen GCs are better than a handful of extremely expensive old gen GCs. Young objects that die young are what modern JVMs are expected to optimize most. –  Voo May 27 '12 at 23:09
    
I am familiar with generational gc:s and the different costs. What I'm trying to say is that there are cases when you cannot afford to even allocate ONE gen0 object inside each iteration, regardless of how cheap it may feel. My example is typically valid for scenarios with many threads that would allocate up to the Gen0 limit quickly if they were allowed to allocate in each iteration. Look at how the .NET Workstation GC handles that for example: once the GC is triggered, ALL threads pause for the GC. Serializing execution like that is much more expensive than the GC and allocation itself. –  Anders Forsgren May 28 '12 at 7:03
1  
Again, talking about allocation mainly in the typical case, not GC. Also: like I said, just profile the code and don't optimize unless there are real performance benefits. –  Anders Forsgren May 28 '12 at 18:45
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The first example makes most sense in terms of object scope, but both should be as memory efficient as the other.

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The compiler optimization will make both of them same. I prefer the first approach better, however, if you were to ignore the compiler optimization. It is more to the point and even Joshua Bloch suggests to do so in Effective Java (a great read).

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The compiler should optimize this for you. I would prefer the first over the second as it is more readable. Letting Object foo have a larger scope could be a source of confusion.

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