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#ifndef UNICODE
#define UNICODE
#endif

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
    FILE* oFile;
    oFile = _wfopen(L"foo.txt",L"w");
    //*
    fwprintf(oFile,L"%s", L"ęłó☺☻♥♦•ń");
    fclose(oFile);
    return 0;
}

Why this program creates an ASCII file instead of UTF-16, though all functions are wide?!

foo.txt Content:

za[question mark]ó[two question marks...] g[...four...] ja[another two...] [five*?] [and the last one]

This is inconvertible.

fwprintf(oFile,L"%c%c%s",0xFE,0xFF,L"zażółć gęśłą jaźń ☺☻♥♦• ć");

Now, it shows Chinese signs, regardless of little or big endian byte order mark is set.

share|improve this question
2  
How are you checking that it's not creating a UTF-16 file? Are you opening it in Notepad or in, say, a hex editor? Notepad probably expects a UTF-16 BOM. In general, writing UTF-16 files is usually a bad idea; it's better to serialize to UTF-8 instead. –  jamesdlin May 26 '12 at 19:17
    
"In general, writing UTF-16 files is usually a bad idea" @jamesdlin -I know, but it's special situation, a utf-16 file must be created. Please read the postscriptum. –  0x6B6F77616C74 May 26 '12 at 19:37
    
@kutacz - This may be a compile-time error; consider using Unicode escape sequences. For example, the BOM can be expressed as L"\uFEFF". –  McDowell May 26 '12 at 19:52
    
@McDowell you meant fwprintf(oFile,L"\uFEFF%s",L"zażółć gęśłą jaźń ☺☻♥♦• ć"); ? It creates an empty file. –  0x6B6F77616C74 May 26 '12 at 20:11
3  
Since you are using a C++ header (<cstdio>), this cannot be a C question. Or, if it is meant to be a C question, update the code to use the C header (<stdio.h>) instead. The name _wfopen() is not standard in either C or C++. You should identify the compiler and platform you are working with/on (probably MSVC on Windows, but all the world is not a PC, and which version of MSVC?). –  Jonathan Leffler May 26 '12 at 23:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Assuming you are using MSVC, to quote the documentation for _wfopen (bold mine):

The fopen function opens the file that is specified by filename. _wfopen is a wide-character version of fopen; the arguments to _wfopen are wide-character strings. Otherwise, _wfopen and fopen behave identically. Just using _wfopen has no effect on the coded character set that is used in the file stream.

Reading further in the documentation:

fopen supports Unicode file streams. To open a Unicode file, pass a ccs flag that specifies the desired encoding to fopen, as follows.

fopen(&fp, "newfile.txt", "rw, ccs= encoding ");

Allowed values of encoding are UNICODE, UTF-8, and UTF-16LE.

The following code writes a UTF-8-encoded file. I saved this source file in UTF-16BE, UTF-16LE, and UTF-8 and MSVC was able to compile and run correctly.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    FILE* oFile;
    oFile = fopen("foo.txt","w, ccs=UTF-8");
    fwprintf(oFile,L"%s", L"ęłó☺☻♥♦•ń");
    fclose(oFile);
    return 0;
}

Note that displaying this output on the Windows command line requires switching to the UTF-8 code page:

C:\x>chcp
Active code page: 1252

C:\x>x

C:\x>type foo.txt
ęłó☺☻♥♦•ń
C:\Users\metolone\Desktop\x>chcp 65001
Active code page: 65001

C:\x>type foo.txt
ęłó☺☻♥♦•ń
share|improve this answer

Choice of character width (char or wchar_t) in a C or C++ program has absolutely nothing to do with file encodings.

If you need, say, a UTF16LE-encoded file, you need to use a locale that specifies UTF16LE, either as your global locale, or imbued in a C++ stream. Alternatively, you may convert your characters to a UTF16LE-encoded sequence of bytes yourself (with iconv or whatever its analogue on Windows) and use byte-oriented output to send it to the file.

NB1: a wide-character string requires a "%ls" format.

NB2: Non-ASCII characters in string literals are non-portable.

NB3: Your tag says "c", <cstdio> is C++, but the program is not a valid C++ program. Which language are you using? Make up your mind ;)

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