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I'm attempting to create my own double linked list for learning experience. My book showed the node struct below and I was wondering is that equivalent to my Node class I created? Is that function in the struct just a type of constructor assigning values to each data type in the struct?

//===== Struct =====

struct Node
{
    Node *next;
    Node *prev;
    std::string val;
    Node(const std::string &value, Node *nextVal = NULL, Node *prevVal = NULL) :
        val(value), next(nextVal), prev(prevVal) {}
};

//===== Class ====
class Node
{
public:
    Node(std::string value = "", Node *pVal = NULL, Node *nVal = NULL);
    virtual ~Node(void);

protected:
    Node *next;
    Node *prev;
    std::string val;
};

Node(std::string value = "", Node *pVal = NULL, Node *nVal = NULL)
{
    next = nVal;
    prev = pVal;
    val = value;
}
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1  
You seem to be ignoring the value argument in some of your constructors. Default values would let you write a single constructor yet use it as if it where your 4 definitions. And do you really need a virtual destructor? Will you have polymorphic nodes? –  K-ballo May 26 '12 at 19:37
    
Thanks for pointing that out I did a copy/paste quickly and forgot to edit that. I also updated it so the one constructor had default values for others that might view this later. Is there any performance issues between a virtual and standard destructor? –  LF4 May 26 '12 at 19:55
    
Yes, there is. One incurs a virtual function call, the other one doesn't. –  K-ballo May 26 '12 at 20:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes - that's exactly what it is.

Here's a page with an example of a struct constructor.

http://www.yolinux.com/TUTORIALS/LinuxTutorialC++Structures.html

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Thank you for the link, I was a bit confused since I've never used a struct for more then simple data types and never used a constructor (thought a struct didn't have functions and that was a difference between classes and them). That is cool to know. –  LF4 May 26 '12 at 19:36
    
The difference is mainly on the default visibility of the attributes and inheritance (private for class, public for struct). –  Samy Arous May 26 '12 at 19:52

This is called a constructor initializer list and it is meant to initialize the attributes of a struct or a class.

This is usually the preferred way of initializing attributes. here's a discussion explaining why:

Is it possible to defer member initialization to the constructor body?

Long story short, if you don't explicitly initialize an attribute in the initializer list, it is initialized implicitly using the default constructor and therefor, you will be initializing the variable twice.

Also, you need accessors for your pointer.

class Node
{
public:
    Node():next(NULL),prev(NULL),val("") {};
    Node(std::string value):next(NULL),prev(NULL),val(value) {};
    Node(std::string value, Node *pVal):next(NULL),prev(pVal),val(value) {};
    Node(std::string value, Node *pVal, Node *nVal):next(nVal),prev(pVal),val(value) {};
    virtual ~Node(void);

    std::string getValue()
    {
        return val;
    }
    void setValue(std::string v)
    {
        val = v;
    }

    Node * getNext()
    {
        return next;
    }
    void setNext(Node * n)
    {
        next = n;
    }

    Node * getPrevious()
    {
        return prev;
    }
    void setPrevious(Node * n)
    {
        prev= n;
    }

protected:
    Node *next;
    Node *prev;
    std::string val;
};
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