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I am creating a database model with Workbench and create the following table:

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `Database`.`table1` (
  `idtable1` INT NOT NULL ,
  `uniquecolumn` INT NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idtable1`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `UniqueIndex` (`uniquecolumn` ASC) )
ENGINE = InnoDB

It has a primary key, and a unique key on my second column.

When I create foreign key constraints on them, Workbench automatically adds two indexes:

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `Database`.`table1` (
  `idtable1` INT NOT NULL ,
  `uniquecolumn` INT NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idtable1`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `UniqueIndex` (`uniquecolumn` ASC) ,
  INDEX `FKOne` (`idtable1` ASC) ,                   //here
  INDEX `FKTwo` (`uniquecolumn` ASC) ,               //(I don't want this!)
  CONSTRAINT `FKOne`
    FOREIGN KEY (`idtable1` )
    REFERENCES `Database`.`table2` (`idtable2` )
    ON DELETE CASCADE
    ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `FKTwo`
    FOREIGN KEY (`uniquecolumn` )
    REFERENCES `Database`.`table2` (`idtable2` )
    ON DELETE CASCADE
    ON UPDATE CASCADE)
ENGINE = InnoDB

(The above is the forward-engineered script after adding the foreign keys to my model)

I have four indexes now.

This is what the MySQL Reference Manual says:

In the referencing table, there must be an index where the foreign key columns are listed as the first columns in the same order. Such an index is created on the referencing table automatically if it does not exist.

So I understand there is no need to create indexes FKOne and FKTwo, since there are already a Primary Key and a Unique index, on the same columns, in the same order. Yet MySQL Workbench doesn't allow me to delete indexes FKOne and FKTwo. And I think I should be able to do this:

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `Database`.`table1` (
  `idtable1` INT NOT NULL ,
  `uniquecolumn` INT NOT NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`idtable1`) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `UniqueIndex` (`uniquecolumn` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `FKOne`
    FOREIGN KEY (`idtable1` )
    REFERENCES `Database`.`table2` (`idtable2` )
    ON DELETE CASCADE
    ON UPDATE CASCADE,
  CONSTRAINT `FKTwo`
    FOREIGN KEY (`uniquecolumn` )
    REFERENCES `Database`.`table2` (`idtable2` )
    ON DELETE CASCADE
    ON UPDATE CASCADE)
ENGINE = InnoDB

Am I right? Would this code work? Is there some way to do it with Workbench? (Apart from deleting those two lines at the last moment before forward-engineering).

Or maybe MySQL is smart enough to refrain from creating totally redundant indexes and I don't have to worry about it...?

share|improve this question
    
Do both of these columns actually reference the same column in the same table - or is that a typo? –  ypercube Jun 9 '12 at 12:20
    
Yes, they reference the same column in the same table, which forces me to delete the row before updating the referenced column! It has nothing to do with this question, though. Maybe I should have chosen another example. –  Dil Jun 9 '12 at 19:53
    
No, it's fine. It's common to have 2 columns refering to the same one - like when defining a parent-child hierarchy. The Unique constraints got me confused for a moment. (and by the way, I had same troubles too, with Workbench). –  ypercube Jun 9 '12 at 21:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

(I'm assuming this is when defining a model.)

See Bug 53277, where I mention the following obscure workaround:

You start with a foreign key and its corresponding generated index that you want to get rid of. Make sure the key is (at least temporarily) on a single non-unique column. In the Indexes tab, change the Type to UNIQUE. Then go to the Columns tab, where UQ is now checked, and uncheck it. The unwanted index is eliminated!

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that's it! Thank you very much!! I was trying to create the foreign keys without creating any other indexes first and then changing the generated indexes to Unique and Primary. Changing to Unique was possible, but not changing to Primary. Your solution, however, adapts to any kind of situation, since it completely deletes the generated index. What strikes me is that it seems to be based on another bug, since one would expect that uncheking UQ column would cause any UNIQUE index on that column to go back to INDEX, not to disappear. –  Dil Jun 9 '12 at 10:38
    
Now I can maintain an exact model of the database and forget about editing forward-engineered scripts. –  Dil Jun 9 '12 at 10:39

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