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I am facing the problem to exchange information between leaves of an inheritance tree, but a specific leaf only needs to exchange information with other specific leaves and not all existing leaves. Please have look at the following (greatly simplified) inheritance tree and sample implementation:

class station
{
virtual void transportOut(item* i, station *target) = 0;
virtual void transportIn(item* i, station *source) = 0;
};

class stationTransportOnly : public station
{
virtual void transportOut(item* i, station *target);
virtual void transportIn(item* i, station *source);
};

class stationTransportAndRotate : public station
{
virtual void transportOut(item* i, station *target);
virtual void transportIn(item* i, station *source);
};

An example implementation of transportOut and transportIn might look like this:

void transportOut(item *i, station *target)
{
 target->transportIn(i, this);
 SendTransportOutCommandToRealMachine(i. target);
}

void transportIn(item *i, station *source)
{
 SendTransportInCommandToRealMachine(i. source);
}

How a station handles the transport (e.g. what commands are send to a real conveyor-belt, which the station models) is station specific. This worked fine for years, but now the requirements changed: Some stations need to synchronize their transportation more than it was necessary in the past. They need a "task id" in their transport commands, which must be the same for the out-transporting station and the in-transporting station. The ID might be generated in transportOut, but the problem is how to carry the id the in-transporting station?

I might simply extend the interface of transportIn, but since only a small number of existing stations require this id it seems bloated and bad design to me. I wonder if there is a better way or how anyone would handle it if they were to design this from scratch.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Not sure I completely get you, but first thought was to attach Task to item. –  Tony Hopkinson May 26 '12 at 21:23
    
ty all who had a look. the problem was solved with the hint buried in the comments to LeSnip3Rs suggestion –  user1295249 May 27 '12 at 17:04

1 Answer 1

Why can't the item carry an id property ? Then the TransportOut could set that id, which will be then read by the TransportIn method.

Like that:

void transportOut(item *i, station *target)
{
    i->SetID(generateID());
    target->transportIn(i, this);
    SendTransportOutCommandToRealMachine(i, target);
}

void transportIn(item *i, station *source)
{
    int taskID = i->GetID();
    SendTransportInCommandToRealMachine(i, source);
}
share|improve this answer
    
because the taskId is bound to a command pair and will change with each new command pair. a transport from A->B->C will have different ids for A->B and B->C. A SetId on the item would at least need additional information for which transition (A->B or B->C) it was meant. –  user1295249 May 27 '12 at 6:46
    
It also still feels bad, i would clobber the item interface with something that only 10% of the stations need, its basically the same what i didnt like in my first own thought :( –  user1295249 May 27 '12 at 6:52
    
Not really, from A->B the id is say, 1, then from B->C it is 2. That's possible because it is set in the outgoing transport function, which in your example intrisincally knows the command pair. Concerning the ugliness of it, it is only adding an integer to the class. But changing the interface to add a "context" paramenter works as well. –  SqueakySquak May 27 '12 at 8:05
    
The only other way is to use a mailbox system. The station class hosts a singleton StationManager that contains command pairs and their tasks ids. So when a command pair gets fired it sets the id in the stationManager, does the call and the receiving end retrieves it from the stationManager again. –  SqueakySquak May 27 '12 at 8:07
    
The ugliness is not adding a single integer (i wouldnt care), but hosting stuff in a base class, which the base itself doesnt need. But i like your mailbox approach. I have a nice place which can host it (outside station - the machine interface class). Thank you! –  user1295249 May 27 '12 at 16:59

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