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I have this code:

            close(pipefd[0]);

            fp = fopen(argv[1], "r");

            if(fp)
            {
                while((c = getc(fp)) != EOF)
                {
                    if((write(pipefd[1], c, 1)) < 1)
                    {
                        fprintf(stderr, "Write to pipe failed.\n");
                        exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
                    }
                }
            }

            fclose(fp);

            close(pipefd[1]);   
            waitpid(childPID, &status, 0);
            exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);

which, to my understanding, should open a file and write its contents to the pipe. This then becomes the stdin for another program. My testing shows that everything is working except the write, but I have no idea why it's not working.

Am I just doing something stupid?

EDIT: Yes, I was doing something stupid.

I thought the problem was with my write (after I fixed c needing to be &c), but it was actually in my child process, where I was using dup2() to link the read end of the pipe to the stdin of my child process. I had the arguments backwards. Here is the working code, from the fork() onwards:

childPID = fork();
if (childPID == 0)
{
    //child code
    //printf("In the child process.\n");
    dup2(pipefd[0], STDIN_FILENO);
    close(pipefd[1]);

    execv(argv[2], paramList);
    printf("You shouldn't be seeing this.\n");
}
else
{
    //parent code
    //printf("In the parent process\n");
    close(pipefd[0]);

    fp = fopen(argv[1], "r");

    if(fp)
    {
        while((c = getc(fp)) != EOF)
        {
            if((write(pipefd[1], &c, 1)) < 1)
            {
                fprintf(stderr, "Write to pipe failed.\n");
                perror("write");
                exit(EXIT_FAILURE);
            }
        }
    }

    fclose(fp);

    close(pipefd[1]);   
    waitpid(childPID, &status, 0);
    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

Hopefully this helps someone else not have to bang their head on the desk for four days! And thank you to everyone who to the time to answer.

share|improve this question
    
You can easily find out why write failed, instead of having to guess. Read the documentation for the perror function. – Sean May 26 '12 at 21:23
    
It's not that it's failing, it just doesn't seem to be doing anything. This is the parent process after a fork, which should be writing the contents of the file to the pipe so the child process can read it. The child process runs fine, but gets nothing to process from the pipe. – Diana134 May 26 '12 at 21:31
    
Correction, write does fail sometimes with "bad address." But only sometimes. – Diana134 May 26 '12 at 21:38
    
Check what the second argument to write is supposed to be, compared to what you're giving it. – Sean May 26 '12 at 21:59
1  
I removed c++ tag, because there is nothing more than C in this code. Could you not use c++ tag for C questions and vice versa in the future? – Griwes May 26 '12 at 22:04

write() takes a pointer to a buffer of data to write, not a character (which is essentially a number).

The answer is simple, instead of passing c to write(), pass the address of c, ie. &c.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that sort of helps. I added a print after the while where write() occurs, and it seems only 3 or 4 lines are being written before the child process decides that's it and terminates. – Diana134 May 26 '12 at 22:25
1  
@Diana134: What is the child process doing? When it closes the read end of the pipe, the write process gets either a SIGPIPE signal or a write error (or both). It could be that this is combining to kill your writer. In particularly, SIGPIPE terminates your program unilaterally and is the default action. – Jonathan Leffler May 26 '12 at 22:31

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