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I have a C# program that detects incoming TCP/IP packets on any given ethernet device. Every packet is processed in the following struct:

struct Packet{
   String sourceIp;
   DateTime arrivalDate;
}

If I have a List of every incoming Packets (List), how do I get those IPs that have more than X packets in less than Y seconds (say 1 second)?

I have no idea how to approach this problem, any help/tip will be highly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
If you already have the list, you just need to count and filter. Where's the problem? –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 26 '12 at 22:04
    
@MahmoudAl-Qudsi if it's so easy, add a solution. Don't assume just because it seems trivial to you that it's trivial to everyone. –  jb. May 26 '12 at 22:24
    
Take a look at this. stackoverflow.com/questions/448203/… –  Blam May 26 '12 at 23:08
    
@jb I have issues when questions show zero attempt at even attempting to reason out what needs to take place. –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi May 26 '12 at 23:29
    
@MahmoudAl-Qudsi I posted what I have done to this moment. Believe me, I've tried several times to aproach this situation. –  Guj Mil May 27 '12 at 0:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using Linq, it will be something like this:

  List<Packet> allPackets =
     new List<Packet>
        {
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:00:00"), sourceIp = "a"},
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:00:01"), sourceIp = "a"},
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:00:01"), sourceIp = "a"},
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:01:00"), sourceIp = "a"},
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:00:00"), sourceIp = "b"},
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:01:00"), sourceIp = "b"},
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:02:00"), sourceIp = "b"},
           new Packet {arrivalDate = DateTime.Parse("2000-01-01 0:03:00"), sourceIp = "b"},
        };
  var xPackets = 2;
  var interval = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(15);

  // We group all the packets by ip, then within that, order the packets by date.
  var ips =
     allPackets
        .GroupBy(
           p => p.sourceIp,
           (ip, packets) => new
                                {
                                   ip,
                                   packets = packets.OrderBy(p => p.arrivalDate).ToList()
                                })
        .ToList();
  // Build a list of IPs with at least x packets in y interval.
  var rapidIps = new List<string>();
  foreach (var ipPacket in ips)
  {
     for (int i = 0, j = xPackets; j < ipPacket.packets.Count; i++, j++)
     {
        if (ipPacket.packets[i].arrivalDate + interval >= ipPacket.packets[j].arrivalDate)
        {
           rapidIps.Add((ipPacket.ip));
           break;
        }

     }
  }

At the end, rapidIps contains [a].

share|improve this answer
    
Since the question is like a filter to prevent Denial Of Services, and i think that you should comment on the Big O of your code. –  BachT May 27 '12 at 0:15
1  
@Bach, Good idea. The linq expression appears to be O(n) + the foreach/for is O(n). So it's O(n) + O(n) = O(n). stackoverflow.com/questions/2799427/… –  agent-j May 27 '12 at 2:08

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