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This question is about Python inheritance but is explained with a Django example, this should't hurt though.

I have this Django model, with Page and RichText models as well:

class Gallery(Page, RichText):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # lot of code to unzip, check and create image instances.
        return "something"

I'm only interested in using the save method in another class.

A solution could be:

class MyGallery(models.Model):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        # here goes the code duplicated from Gallery, the same.
        return "something"

I'd like to avoid the code duplication and also I'm not interested in inheriting members from Page and RichText (so I don't want to do class MyGallery(Gallery):. If it would be legal I'd write something like this:

class MyGallery(models.Model):
    # custom fields specific for MyGallery
    # name = models.CharField(max_length=50)
    # etc

    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return Gallery.save(self, *args, **kwargs)

But it won't work because the save() in Gallery expects an instance of Gallery, not MyGallery.

Any way to "detach" the save() method from Gallery and use it in MyGallery as it were defined there?

EDIT:

I forgot to say that Gallery is given and can't be changed.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can access the __func__ attribute of the save method:

class Gallery(object):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return self, args, kwargs

class MyGallery(object):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return Gallery.save.__func__(self, *args, **kwargs)
    # or 
    # save = Gallery.save.__func__

mg = MyGallery()
print mg.save('arg', kwarg='kwarg')
# (<__main__.MyGallery object at 0x04DAD070>, ('arg',), {'kwarg': 'kwarg'})

but you're better off refactoring if possible:

class SaveMixin(object):
    def save(self, *args, **kwargs):
        return self, args, kwargs

class Gallery(SaveMixin, object):
    pass

class MyGallery(SaveMixin, object):
    pass

or

def gallery_save(self, *args, **kwargs):
    return self, args, kwargs

class Gallery(object):
    save = gallery_save

class MyGallery(object):
    save = gallery_save
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I'm not sure why you are against inheritance, particularly with regard to methods. I regularly create a MixIn class that is inherited by all of my Django models.Model, and it contains all manner of useful methods for URL creation, dumps, etc., etc. I do make the methods defensive in that they use hasattr() to make sure they apply to a particular class, but doing this is a real time saver.

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I'm not against inheritance in general, but in this case I am. If MyGallery would inherit from Gallery, the subclass would have methods I will never use, so it seems a nonsense to me to have something you don't use but require memory, too. Then, for how Django works, the inherited classes would also contribute in terms of new database fields (useless in my scenario). –  Guandalino May 26 '12 at 23:37
    
Finally, mixins don't fit well because I cannot change the Gallery class. –  Guandalino May 26 '12 at 23:38
1  
@Guandalino: I accept that this is not how you want to do it, but I don't believe that in Python methods inherited from other classes take any more room than a simple pointer from the child class to the parent class. As for the DB fields, I am in total agreement with you. I've tried to do that a couple of times and it was a) awkward, b) unintuitive. Good Luck. –  Peter Rowell May 27 '12 at 1:32
    
at the end of the story I think you are right for everything. But still the mixin solution doesn't apply in my case. Thanks for sharing your thoughts. –  Guandalino Jun 1 '12 at 19:31
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