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I am trying to create a LinkedList class with polymorphism and inheritance from Stack and Queue header files. This is the first time I've tried to use templates but keep getting errors like "class template has already been defined" or "abstract class type is not allowed". How do I implement a template since I'm obviously doing it incorrectly?

// LinkedList.h File
#include "Stack.h"
#include "Queue.h"
#include "Node.h"

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class LinkedList : public Queue<T>, public Stack<T>
{
public:
    LinkedList();
    ~LinkedList(void);

protected:
    Node<T> *first;
    Node<T> *last;
    int numItems;
};

// LinkedList.cpp File
#include "LinkedList.h"

using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class LinkedList
{
    LinkedList()
    {
        first = NULL;
        last = NULL;
        numItems = 0;
    }

    LinkedList::~LinkedList(void)
    {
        while (first != NULL)
        {
            Node* cur = first;
            first = first->next;
            delete cur;
        }
    }

    LinkedList::clear() {}    
    LinkedList::size() {}

    // Stack Functions
    LinkedList::push(T item) {}    
    LinkedList::pop() {}    
    LinkedList::top() {}

    // Queue Functions
    LinkedList::enqueue(T item) {}    
    LinkedList::dequeue() {}    
    LinkedList::peek() {}
}

// Stack.h File (Queue is the same except push/pop/top = enqueue/dequeue/peek)
#pragma once

template <typename T> class Stack
{

public:

  virtual ~Stack() {}

  virtual int size() = 0;
  virtual void clear() = 0;
  virtual void push(T item) = 0;
  virtual T pop() = 0;
  virtual T top() = 0;

};

Updated Code

// LinkedList.h File
#pragma once
#include "Stack.h"
#include "Queue.h"
#include "Node.h"

template <typename T>
class LinkedList : public Queue<T>, public Stack<T>
{
public:
    LinkedList();
    ~LinkedList(void);

    void clear();
    int size();

    void push(T item);
    T pop();
    T top();

    void enqueue(T item);
    T dequeue();
    T peek();


protected:
    Node<T> *first;
    Node<T> *last;
    int numItems;
};

// LinkedList.cpp File
#include "LinkedList.h"

class LinkedList
{
    LinkedList::LinkedList()
    {
        first = NULL;
        last = NULL;
        numItems = 0;
    }

    LinkedList::~LinkedList(void)
    {
        while (first != NULL)
        {
            Node* cur = first;
            first = first->next;
            delete cur;
        }
    }

    LinkedList::clear(){}
    LinkedList::size(){}

    // Stack Functions
    void LinkedList::push(T item){}
    T LinkedList::pop(){}
    T LinkedList::top(){}

    // Queue Functions
    void LinkedList::enqueue(T item){}
    T LinkedList::dequeue(){}
    T LinkedList::peek(){}
}


// Stack.h File (Queue is the same except push/pop/top = enqueue/dequeue/peek)
#pragma once

template <typename T> class Stack
{

public:

  virtual ~Stack() {}

  virtual int size() = 0;
  virtual void clear() = 0;
  virtual void push(T item) = 0;
  virtual T pop() = 0;
  virtual T top() = 0;

};
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I see

// LinkedList.cpp File

Template definitions have to be visible on every translation unit, you cannot place their definitions in a cpp file and expect it to work (like it does for regular classes). Definitions for all template functions should be present at a header file.

Also, the compiler error is correct. You are writing definitions for two LinkedList classes. I assume you were looking for:

LinkedList::LinkedList(){ ... }
share|improve this answer
    
So I should implement my template in the LinkedList.h file and write my functions as standalone LinkedList::FunctionName() in a cpp file with out being part of a class? –  LF4 May 26 '12 at 23:29
    
@LF4: That's usually the case for regular classes. When writing templates, you need to define your functions within the header file. Whether they are defined within the class or outside the class is mostly irrelevant, except that when the definition is outside the class you should declare it inline. –  K-ballo May 26 '12 at 23:31
    
I've included updated code on what I think you were trying to explain. I guess my question is where/how do I write the function of the template class? It all goes in the template? Thanks for helping. –  LF4 May 26 '12 at 23:54
1  
@LF4: Your update code still talks about a cpp file for templates. Try getting ride of your cpp file, move its definitions and use them to replace the ones in your header file. You'd still have errors, but you would be closer to a solution. –  K-ballo May 26 '12 at 23:55
1  
Wow I wish teachers would choose their words wisely. I had 3 say "No code in header files" when it should have been "No code in header files except templates which you'll learn about later". Thanks that was the brick wall I kept hitting. –  LF4 May 27 '12 at 0:12

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