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What am I missing here ? It's driving me nuts !

I have a function that returns a const char*

const char* Notation() const
{
    char s[10];
    int x=5;
    sprintf(s, "%d", x);
    return s;
}

Now in another part of the code I am doing this :

.....
.....
char str[50];       
sprintf(str, "%s", Notation());
.....
.....

but str remains unchanged.

If instead I do this :

.....
.....
char str[50];
str[0]=0;
strcat(str, Notation());
.....
.....

str is correctly set.

I am wondering why sprintf doesn't work as expected...

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Maybe one idea is to change the function to : void Notation(char* buffer) const and work on the caller-provided char buffer. –  Wartin May 27 '12 at 5:30
    
Why the downvote? The question is clear, a "working" sample was given, which shows effort, and the actual problem sample is given. –  chris May 27 '12 at 5:43
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You're trying to return an array allocated on stack and its behaviour is undefined.

const char* Notation() const
{
    char s[10];
    int x=5;
    sprintf(s, "%d", x);
    return s;
}

here s isn't going to be around after you've returned from the function Notation(). If you aren't concerned with thread safety you could make s static.

const char* Notation() const
{
    static char s[10];
    ....
share|improve this answer
    
I thought that the buffer is allocated at compile time and stays there for the lifetime of the application. If this is not true, then wouldn't this mean that every function returning a non-global const char* is wrong ? (and dangerous) –  Wartin May 27 '12 at 5:26
1  
Any function that returns an automatic const char* is dangerous. There are many other ways of returning buffers - for example static and also newly allocated buffer using malloc. however if you return malloc'd buffers you've to manage cleanup properly. –  hawk May 27 '12 at 5:28
    
@Wartin: I think you are thinking of string literals. If, for example, you said: return "foobar"; -- That would be safe, as the string "foobar" lasts through the lifetime of the application. –  Benjamin Lindley May 27 '12 at 5:29
    
@hawk : Do you think that making the buffer static will do the job ? I am not concerned with thread safety (but I wonder why it matters ;-) –  Wartin May 27 '12 at 5:35
2  
@Wartin - Roughly speaking static inside a function extends the lifetime of the variable to end of the program. however the visibility is just like an automatic variable. The reason it's not threadsafe is simply that multple threads could be concurrently executing in the function and stepping on each other. –  hawk May 27 '12 at 5:39
show 1 more comment

In both cases, it invokes undefined behavior, as Notation() returns a local array which gets destroyed on returning. You're unlucky that it works in one case, making you feel that it is correct.

The solution is to use std::string as:

std::string Notation() const
{
    char s[10];
    int x=5;
    sprintf(s, "%d", x);
    return s; //it is okay now, s gets converted into std::string
}

Or using C++ stream as:

std::string Notation() const
{
    int x=5;
    std::ostringstream oss;
    oss << x;
    return oss.str(); 
}

and then:

char str[50];       
sprintf(str, "%s", Notation().c_str());

The benefit (and beauty) of std::ostringstream (and std::string) is that you don't have to know the size of output in advance, which means you don't have to use magic number such as 10 in array declaration char s[10]. These classes are safe in that sense.

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char s[10] in Notation is placed on stack so it gets destroyed after exit from Notation function. Such variables are called automatic. You need to save your string in heap using new:

char *s = new char[10];

But you have to free this memory manually:

char str[50];
const char *nt = Notation();
sprintf(str, "%s", nt);
printf("%s", str);
delete[] nt;

If you really use C++ then use built-in string class like Nawaz suggested. If you somehow restricted to raw pointers then allocate buffer outside Notation and pass it as destanation parameter like in sprintf or strcat.

share|improve this answer
1  
While that would solve the problem, it's a terrible idea. If he tried to use the function the way he is now, it would be a guaranteed memory leak. –  Benjamin Lindley May 27 '12 at 5:26
    
Yes, that is it. Since the question is about C++ then string is the best choice. –  Kirill May 27 '12 at 5:29
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