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I'm trying to solve this problem and I'm new to backtracking algorithms, The problem is about making a pyramid like this so that a number sitting on two numbers is the sum of them. Every number in the pyramid has to be different and less than 100. Like this:

     88
   39  49
  15  24  25
 4  11  13  12
1  3   8   5   7 

Any pointers on how to do this using backtracking?

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I think it would help if you provided more instructions, such as how many total numbers there should be in the pyramid, or any other requirement. –  Raj May 27 '12 at 17:24
    
I assume the whole thing is about: given a number N (N<100) creates the tallest pyramid possible such as a number sitting on two numbers is the sum of them. –  Jean-Pascal Billaud May 28 '12 at 5:05
    
... and the resulting pyramid has N as its top... –  Jean-Pascal Billaud May 28 '12 at 5:24

1 Answer 1

Not necessarily backtracking but the property you are asking for is interestingly very similar to the Pascal Triangle property.

The Pascal Triangle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pascal's_triangle), which is used for efficient computation of binomial coefficient among other things, is a pyramid where a number is equal to the sum of the two numbers above it with the top being 1.

As you can see you are asking the opposite property where a number is the sum of the numbers below it.

                1
              1   1
            1   2   1
          1   3   3   1
        1   4   6   4   1
      1   5  10  10   5   1
    1   6  15  20  15   6   1
  1   7  21  35  35  21   7   1
1   8  28  56  70  56  28   8   1

For instance in the Pascal Triangle above, if you wanted the top of your pyramid to be 56, your pyramid will be a reconstruction bottom up of the Pascal Triangle starting from 56 and that will give something like:

                 56
              21    35
            6    15    20
         1     5    10    10

Again that's not a backtracking solution and this might not give you a good enough solution for every single N though I thought this was an interesting approximation that was worth noting.

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