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def first[A] :Tuple2[A,_] => A  = ( pair :Tuple2[A,_] ) => pair._1
val name = first( ("Anna", 23) )

"If you take a closer look at line 2, what you see here is a method call which returns a newly created function of type Tuple2[String,Any] => String (since the compiler kicks in and infers the needed type for applying to person). Although the whole expression looks like an ordinary method call, it’s in fact a method call (to a factory method without any parameter) and a function call which follows afterwards. " -- this is the explanation of the above code.

I am not able to reason about the first step of the above process (the process creating a function object). Can someone write out a "human compiler" procedure explicitly?

EDIT: I think the fully expanded logic for line 2 should be the following two lines

val firstAsFunc= first[String]; 
val name = firstAsFunc(("Anna", 23))
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure to break it down further. Here's what I can think of -- I hope you get it, or that someone else is feeling more clever than I.

scala> val func = first[String] // method call
func: Tuple2[String, _] => String = <function1>

scala> val name = func( ("Anna", 23) )
name: String = Anna

The problem with the above is that func is really a getter -- a method call itself -- so I'm hardly changing anything.

EDIT

I'm not sure what you mean by formal parameter. The method first doesn't have value parameters, just type parameters. Trying to pass a value parameter to it would be a syntactical error.

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Nice answer! Why do you use val func instead of def func? –  Christopher Chiche May 27 '12 at 9:25
1  
@ChrisJamesC - Because Daniel is pointing out that a function object is returned, so you can simply store that function object for later use. If you used def func, you'd make a new call (to first) to create a new function object each time func was used. –  Rex Kerr May 27 '12 at 11:31
    
@RexKerr thanks for the explanation. –  Christopher Chiche May 27 '12 at 11:41
    
Chris, nice answer! If we follow your code, I tested -- "scala> (name).isInstanceOf[Function1[Tuple2[,],]]" -- "scala> (name).isInstanceOf[Function1[Tuple2[String,],String]]" Both are true –  chen May 27 '12 at 17:47

When you say

(pair: Tuple2[A,_]) => pair._1

the compiler decides that you are actually saying

new Function1[Tuple2[A,_], A] {
  def apply(pair: Tuple2[A,_]) = pair._1
}

That is, the first method creates a new object (of type Function1) with a method called apply which then is transparently called when you say first(...). (You would get the same thing if you wrote first.apply(...).)

(Note: Tuple2[A,_] can itself be abbreviated (A,_).)

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I'm not 100% sure that I understand which bit of the process you're asking about - are you asking about what a function object is? I'll answer that question on the assumption that it is :-)

A function object is an object that derives from one of the FunctionN (Function0, Function1 etc.) traits and implements an apply method. So your example could be rewritten:

scala> def first[A]: Tuple2[A, _] => A = new Function1[Tuple2[A, _], A] { def apply(pair: Tuple2[A, _]) = pair._1 }
first: [A]=> Tuple2[A, _] => A

scala> val name = first( ("Anna", 23) )
name: java.lang.String = Anna

You can see that a function is actually an instance of FunctionN like so:

scala> def foo(x: Int, y: Double): String = "x = "+ x.toString +", "+ y.toString
foo: (x: Int, y: Double)String

scala> (foo _).isInstanceOf[Function2[_, _, _]]
res1: Boolean = true
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I was asking what is the formal parameter for method first. –  chen May 27 '12 at 18:12

If you take a closer look at line 2, what you see here is a method call which returns a newly created function of type Tuple2[String,Any] => String

This explanation is wrong. Line 2 does not "return a newly created function". The function is created on line 1, as explained by Rex Kerr.

Although the whole expression [on line 2] looks like an ordinary method call, it’s in fact a method call (to a factory method without any parameter) and a function call which follows afterwards.

I don't believe this is true; there is no hidden factory method going on, because the Function1 object has already been created on line 1.

One of the questions I was asking what is the formal parameter for method first.

See Wikipedia > Parameter # Computer Science

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This is incorrect. Because first is a def, no function is created on its definition. Instead, every time first is called (such as line 2), a new anonymous function is created. If you have any doubts, try out first eq first. –  Daniel C. Sobral May 28 '12 at 15:49
    
@DanielC.Sobral is this true of all defs? Any reference to a def'd thing actually desugars to a factory method call? Can you point me to some official Scala docs that explain this in detail? –  Dan Burton May 29 '12 at 4:59
    
Any time you use an identifier which is a def causes the body of the def to be executed. An anonymous function literal (x => f(x)) is an instantiation of an object, so it will create a new object each time it is called. If you insert side effects into the function, you can observe the effects better. –  Daniel C. Sobral May 29 '12 at 18:27

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