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Is it possible to show an alternate image if the original source file is not found? I would like to achieve this only with css and html, no javascript (or jQuery and alike). The idea is to still show an image instead of the "alt" test or default (ugly) cross of IE. If not possible without javascript I will then rather check the img src with php with a basic if-then-else.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this using the CSS background-image property of the img element, i.e.

img
{
background-image:url('default.png');
}

However, you have to give a width or height for this to work (when the img-src is not found):

img
{
background-image:url('default.png');
width:400px;
}
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Did it work when you tested it? On my Firefox, the background is not shown when the real image is missing. On my IE, the background is shown, but so is the alt text or the red “×” in a box. –  Jukka K. Korpela May 27 '12 at 8:04
    
I already selected the aswer but I have still a question: what do you mean with "you have to give a width or height for this to work (when the img-src is not found)"? If my img tag already has width and height will that be used also by the background image? –  rodedo May 27 '12 at 8:07
    
Yes, I think that should work. –  emrea May 27 '12 at 8:08
    
@JukkaK.Korpela I quickly tried on my chromium and it seems that a file-not-found icon shows up at the center. –  emrea May 27 '12 at 8:11
    
Be aware that for this to work, the path to the background image has to be relative to the folder where the file with the css code is (this was not obvious for me...) or an absolute URL. In addition, this solution has the drawback of showing two images one on top of the other if the real image is found and is "transparent" (e.g. like an icon); in this case another css class with background-image:none; is needed to handle special cases. –  rodedo Jun 3 '12 at 15:18
<object data="foobar.png" width=200 height=200>
  <img src="test.png" alt="Just testing.">
</object>

Here foobar.png is the primary image, test.png is the fallback image. By the semantics of the object element, the content of the element (here the img element) should be rendered if and only if the primary data (specified by the data attribute) cannot be used.

Though browsers have had awful bugs in implementations of object in the past year, this simple technique seems to work on modern versions of IE, Firefox, Chrome.

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Test case: jsfiddle.net/VkrJ4/1 OK in W7Pro x64 with Fx 12.0, IE9, Saf 5.1.5 and Op 11.64. Not tested with Chrome/Chromium. Not tested with screen readers and other ATs for now (the question being: "Are NVDA, JAWS, VoiceOver, ORCA, etc reading the @alt text to their users?") –  FelipeAls May 27 '12 at 9:41

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