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Starting to work with XSLT, that's fun, I like the principal although it will take a little time to get used to. Now... I already ran in a problem which I'm wondering about and maybe someone could enlighten me about it.

I have a set of boxes with a priority. The box with the smaller priority appears first. This works great. However, I'd like to place my boxes in rows and have row 1 & 3 marked as odd, and row 2 marked as even (I'm expected to have many more rows with the real project.)

Thus, I thought I should be able to use the fn:position() function. Unfortunately, the position returned is the one of the original nodes, not the resulting sorted nodes. Is there a way to fix that problem?

There is a sample XSLT that exposes the problem:

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:template match="body">
    <xsl:apply-templates>
      <xsl:sort select="@priority" data-type="number"/>
    </xsl:apply-templates>
  </xsl:template>
  <xsl:template match="body/box">
<div class="box">
Box[<xsl:value-of select="count(preceding-sibling::box) + 1" />,<xsl:value-of select="position()"/>] = (<xsl:value-of select="@priority"/>)
  <xsl:copy-of select="title"/></div>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

And there is an example of input. TWO should appear first, then THREE and finally ONE.

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<body>
  <box priority="103">
    <title>This is box ONE</title>
  </box>
  <box priority="1">
    <title>This is box TWO</title>
  </box>
  <box priority="12">
    <title>This is box THREE</title>
  </box>
</body>

Yet I'd expect position() to be 1, 2, and 3... but this is the output:

<div class="box">
Box[2,4] = (1)
  <title>This is box TWO</title>
</div>
<div class="box">
Box[3,6] = (12)
  <title>This is box THREE</title>
</div>
<div class="box">
Box[1,2] = (103)
  <title>This is box ONE</title>
</div>

The second number inside the Box square brackets is the position(). I was expected 1, 2, 3. But as we can see, we get 4, 6, 2 which is the position of the node in the original document (I'm not too sure why it's x2 though, when I tested with an xsl:for-each tag, it was 2, 3, and 1 instead.)

I tested with xmlpatterns (Qt 4.7) and xsltproc (libxml2, this should use version 1.0, the code is compatible to 1.0) and both return the same numbers.

So... is that a limit of XSLT, or is that a bug in those two XSLT implementations?!

Update May 27, 2012

It was determined that QXmlQuery (xmlpatterns) is a broken parser in that specific case. The position() must be computed using something similar to count(preceding-sibling::box) + 1 instead of the correct index in the running for-each or template sequence.

share|improve this question
    
Update Dec 2012, I'm now using Qt 4.8 on Ubuntu 12.04 and it works better. Not perfect yet, but I can generally get the results I'm expecting. –  Alexis Wilke Dec 16 '12 at 3:59

2 Answers 2

Well you do

<xsl:apply-templates>
  <xsl:sort select="@priority" data-type="number"/>
</xsl:apply-templates>

which is an abbreviation of doing

<xsl:apply-templates select="node()">
  <xsl:sort select="@priority" data-type="number"/>
</xsl:apply-templates>

which processes all kind of child nodes, both the element nodes you seem to be interested in as well as the white space text nodes between elements. So use

<xsl:apply-templates select="box">
  <xsl:sort select="@priority" data-type="number"/>
</xsl:apply-templates>

and you should at least have the position() as 1,2,3, as you want.

For what it's worth, I tested xsltproc on Windows with the stylesheet

<?xml version="1.0"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
  <xsl:template match="body">
    <xsl:apply-templates select="box">
      <xsl:sort select="@priority" data-type="number"/>
    </xsl:apply-templates>
  </xsl:template>
  <xsl:template match="body/box">
<div class="box">
Box[<xsl:value-of select="count(preceding-sibling::box) + 1" />,<xsl:value-of select="position()"/>] = (<xsl:value-of select="@priority"/>)
  <xsl:copy-of select="title"/></div>
  </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

against the input you posted and the result is

compilation error: file test2012052702.xsl line 2 element stylesheet
xsl:version: only 1.0 features are supported
<?xml version="1.0"?>
<div class="box">
Box[2,1] = (1)
  <title>This is box TWO</title></div><div class="box">
Box[3,2] = (12)
  <title>This is box THREE</title></div><div class="box">
Box[1,3] = (103)
  <title>This is box ONE</title></div>

so the position is right I think.

share|improve this answer
    
Hmmm... Just tried and I get the exact same result when using select="node()". However, the select="box" works as expected, limiting the selection to the box tags. However, position() is still 2, 3, 1 instead of 1, 2, 3... –  Alexis Wilke May 27 '12 at 11:52
    
When I use my suggested change to apply-templates only on the box elements then I can't reproduce the problem with xsltproc nor with Saxon 9 so I am not sure why you get the position in that order you show. –  Martin Honnen May 27 '12 at 11:55
    
Okay! That's correct, xsltproc works correctly. xmlpatterns still says 2, 3, 1... –  Alexis Wilke May 27 '12 at 19:29
    
Then xmlpatterns has a bug if it is supposed to implement the XSLT 1.0 or 2.0 specification. –  Martin Honnen May 28 '12 at 17:20
    
Martin, yes, indeed. They say somewhere in their documentation that they are at about 54% compliance. But I wasn't expecting something this basic to be that wrong. –  Alexis Wilke May 28 '12 at 23:58

Can't repro this.

I run your transformation with Saxon 9.1.07 and the result is;

<div class="box">
      Box[2,5] = (1)
      <title>This is box TWO</title></div><div class="box">
      Box[3,6] = (12)
      <title>This is box THREE</title></div><div class="box">
      Box[1,7] = (103)
      <title>This is box ONE</title></div>

As we see, the positions are correct (still not 1,2,3 -- because white-space-only nodes are also present).

The same result is produced by XQSharp (XmlPrime).

AltovaXML2009 (XML-SPY) produces even this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?><div class="box">
    Box[2,1] = (1)
      <title>This is box TWO</title></div><div class="box">
    Box[3,2] = (12)
      <title>This is box THREE</title></div><div class="box">
    Box[1,3] = (103)
      <title>This is box ONE</title></div>

which means that it uses an XML parser that strips-off white-space-only text nodes.

An improved version of this transformation would exclude white-space-only nodes:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
 <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="yes" indent="yes"/>
 <xsl:strip-space elements="*"/>

 <xsl:template match="body">
        <xsl:apply-templates>
          <xsl:sort select="@priority" data-type="number"/>
        </xsl:apply-templates>
 </xsl:template>

 <xsl:template match="box">
    <div class="box">
      Box[<xsl:value-of select="count(preceding-sibling::box) + 1" />
      <xsl:text>,</xsl:text>
      <xsl:value-of select="position()"/>
      <xsl:text>] = (</xsl:text>
      <xsl:value-of select="@priority"/>)
      <xsl:copy-of select="title"/></div>
 </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

When this transformation is applied against the provided XML document:

<body>
    <box priority="103">
        <title>This is box ONE</title>
    </box>
    <box priority="1">
        <title>This is box TWO</title>
    </box>
    <box priority="12">
        <title>This is box THREE</title>
    </box>
</body>

the wanted, correct result is produced:

<div class="box">
      Box[2,1] = (1)
      <title>This is box TWO</title>
</div>
<div class="box">
      Box[3,2] = (12)
      <title>This is box THREE</title>
</div>
<div class="box">
      Box[1,3] = (103)
      <title>This is box ONE</title>
</div>

Notes: xsl:strip-space is used to exclude the white-space-only nodes even from being parsed.

Conclusion: The reported result is due either to using a buggy XSLT processor, or to performing a transformation that is different than the provided one.

share|improve this answer
    
This is why I was testing with two different parsers. I was thinking that the libxml2 parser would be more like what you'd expect (closer to what the XSLT reference says.) Martin's fix (the other answer) actually fixed xsltproc (libxml2 parser) but xmlpattern (the Qt 4.7 version) is still broken. So that parser doesn't recompute the position() properly! Annoying... Thank you for the detailed info. –  Alexis Wilke May 27 '12 at 19:39

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