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I have several classes deferred from base class File_plugin. I want to have an instance of each class in every instance of class File. Here is a naive implementation of this:

class File {
public:
  File(): plugin1(this), plugin2(this), /*... */ {}
  Plugin1 plugin1;
  Plugin2 plugin2;
  Plugin3 plugin3;
  Plugin4 plugin4;
}; 

class File_plugin {
public:
  File_plugin(File* p_file): file(p_file) {}

protected:
  File* file;
};

class Plugin1: public File_plugin {
  void some_action() {
    //we can access another plugin as:
    Plugin2* p2 = &( file->plugin2 );
  }
};

But it's bad that File class must know implementation of all plugins. We usually use forward declaration of classes every place it's possible. So, File must not know implementation of plugins or even list of classes names. Some plugins will be loaded from DLL in runtime, so we don't know their names in compile time.

Also, a plugin must not know about existence of almost all other plugins. But if a plugin know about some other plugin, it must be able to get object of this plugin and use it.

Now I'm using the following implementation:

class File {
public:
  File() : plugins(Plugins_registry::get_file_plugins(this)) { }

  template<class T>
  T *get_plugin() {
    foreach(File_plugin *p, plugins) {
      T* o = dynamic_cast<T*>(p);
      if (o) return o;
    }
    throw Bad_exception(tr("File plugin not found"));
  }
private:
  QList<File_plugin*> plugins;
}

QList<File_plugin*> Plugins_registry::get_file_plugins(File* file) {
  QList<File_plugin*> list;
  list << new Plugin1(file);
  list << new Plugin2(file);
  list << new Plugin3(file);
  list << new Plugin4(file);

  //code below is untested
  QPluginLoader loader("plugin5.dll");
  list << dynamic_cast<My_plugin_class>(loader.instance)->get_file_plugin();

  return list;
}

class Plugin1: public File_plugin {
  void some_action() {
    //we can access another plugin as:
    Plugin2* p2 = file->get_plugin<Plugin2>();
  }
};

Some plugins can be stored in external libraries (represented as DLL on Windows). It's not implemented now, but will be in the future. I think my current implementation allow that but I didn't check.

The biggest problem of this implementation is slow plugin search (using for and dynamic_cast). So I can't just put calls of get_plugin everywhere, I have to store returned value and use it for fast access. It's uncomfortable. Also, this solution just don't look perfect. Are there any way to get it better?

share|improve this question
    
I'm having a hard time understanding any of that. Why do your plugins need an instance of File to be constructed (and conversly why do you need a list of plugins for each file object)? What's more, how will you ever be able to call get_plugins if the user code doesn't have direct (compile-time) access to the full declarations of the plugin classes? – Mat May 27 '12 at 14:16
    
Maybe come at this a different way, using Plugin2::getInstance()? – Vaughn Cato May 27 '12 at 14:37
    
@Mat for example, Plugin2 instance keeps data related only to one File instance. It's more convenient to create new instance for each File object. I don't think it makes things more complicated. About your second question: if Plugin1 is defined in the program core and Plugin5 is defined in DLL, Plugin1 of course can't access Plugin5, but Plugin5 can access Plugin1 and plugins defined in the same DLL (if any). – Pavel Strakhov May 27 '12 at 14:49
    
@Vaughn Cato , it will be looks like Plugin2::getInstance(file), because there is an instance for every File object. So, I still need to find the instance in array or Plugin2 instances (or store it in map with file id as a key), but I don't need to do dynamic_cast. So, it's a bit better, thank you. – Pavel Strakhov May 27 '12 at 14:54

Here's an example of how to implement it by creating a map for each plugin type:

class File {
public:
  File() { }

  template<class T>
  T *get_plugin() {
    T *result = T::getInstance(this);
    if (!result) {
      throw Bad_exception(tr("File plugin not found"));
    }
    return result;
  }
};

class File_plugin {
  public:
    File_plugin(File *file)
    : file(file)
    {
    }

  protected:
    File *file;
};

template <class Plugin>
class Basic_File_Plugin : public File_plugin {
  public:
    Basic_File_Plugin(File *file,Plugin *plugin)
    : File_plugin(file)
    {
      instances[file] = plugin;
    }

    ~Basic_File_Plugin()
    {
      instances.erase(file);
    }

    static Plugin *getInstance(File *file)
    {
      return instances[file];
    }

  private:
    static std::map<File *,Plugin *> instances;
};


template <class Plugin>
std::map<File *,Plugin *> Basic_File_Plugin<Plugin>::instances =
  std::map<File *,Plugin *>();

class Plugin1 : public Basic_File_Plugin<Plugin1> {
  public:
    Plugin1(File *file)
    : Basic_File_Plugin<Plugin1>(file,this)
    {
    }

    void some_action();
};

class Plugin2 : public Basic_File_Plugin<Plugin2> {
  public:
    Plugin2(File *file)
    : Basic_File_Plugin<Plugin2>(file,this)
    {
    }
};


void Plugin1::some_action()
{
  Plugin2 *p2 = file->get_plugin<Plugin2>();
}
share|improve this answer

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