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I using c# winforms and wanted to know how it's better to write and why.

if(txtName.Text == "John")
    ;

or

String name = txtName.Text
if (name == "John")
    ;

Edit: Thanks guys you helped me a lot!!!

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closed as primarily opinion-based by dtb, Jon B, Athari, rene, Stijn Mar 14 at 12:56

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You should use .Equals() when comparing strings. –  Evan Mulawski May 27 '12 at 16:50
3  
@EvanMulawski: That's true for Java, but not for C#. –  dtb May 27 '12 at 16:53
    
@dtb: It is still good practice. –  Evan Mulawski May 27 '12 at 16:55
3  
Not really. With .Equals you have to check for null references before you make the call, while == will take care of this for you. –  dtb May 27 '12 at 16:57
1  
@EvanMulawski Honestly, quantity != quality. In C#, since its early versions, the recommended way to do equality checks is using the equality operator. Sure .Equals could be the same, but it's more a Java approach than a C# one. And I didn't tell you about "background" because of handle or not handle a null string. It's just because your recommendation isn't in the right way. –  Matías Fidemraizer May 28 '12 at 6:10

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The second version is pointless - it is longer, less readable and introduces one extra variable (though a good compiler would get rid of it, assuming it is not used elsewhere).

Of the two choices, this one is better:

if(txtName.Text == "John")

Though I would go with a third:

if(txtName.Text.Equals("John", StringComparison.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase)

You may want the StringComparison option to be a different enumeration value, depending on how you want the comparison to occur.

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Why InvariantCulture and not CurrentUICulture? –  dtb May 27 '12 at 16:54
    
@dtb - Why CurrentUICulture and not InvariantCulture? –  Oded May 27 '12 at 16:55
    
txtName.Text contains user input from the UI. The UI is localized according to CurrentUICulture. –  dtb May 27 '12 at 16:57

For simplicity sake I would go with:

if(txtName.Text.Equals("John"))
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Why "Equals" in C#? Do you have any strong argument for that? –  Matías Fidemraizer May 27 '12 at 18:59
    
The static method String.Equals would make sense, but using instance-based Equals without a null-check could be hazardous since we do not know the exact context (winforms inits strings to null unless otherwise specified). If you use the instance-based string equals, do it the other way around: if ("John".Equals(txtName.Text)) { CODE }. –  flindeberg May 28 '12 at 7:08

Maybe I'm wrong, but others are answering to some complex scenario which isn't the case of one suggested by OP.

What's better?

In fact, it's the same. There's a single difference: first approach, you're storing control's text in a variable and later you check if it's equal to John. Second approach does the same thing, but it gets control's text accessing its string value directly by calling Text property.

When to use a variable and when to access to the property directly? It's just an assumption, because this will depend on each particular use case, but in common terms, call Text property directly if you're accessing its object (the text) just for checking it in a moment of time, otherwise, you'd want to store it in some variable if:

  • If you want to do some concatenation with Text without affecting the text held by this (if you concatenate it to the Text, you're going to modify it in your app user interface too!).

  • You're in a multi-threaded environment and you want to get Text in its current state because it can change since user interface is available to the user and it can change its value during some operation.

  • You just like variables!. If you find using variables clarifies your code better and adds meaning, why not? Nowadays' computers, even mobile phones, have a lot of memory and one, two or three variables wouldn't change anything (maybe 1KB more? wohoo!).

That's all.

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Thank you very much... I will keep all that in my mind –  biox May 27 '12 at 21:04
    
@xoemab No problem :) –  Matías Fidemraizer May 28 '12 at 7:56

Read Best Practices for Using Strings in the .NET Framework.

if (String.Equals(txtName.Text, "John", StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)) {
   // ...Code.
}
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For string comparison i would suggest:

string.compare(strA, strB, stringComparisonMethod)

For accessing the text it doesn't matter, the second way is more friendly but both will do the same

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I think the later is better because you will be using a less variable i.e. name . Except that I don't see any difference (the styling is obviously upto yourself)

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If you're using the value in other parts of your code, I'd go with defining a variable. Otherwise, use the shorter version.

In C# you don't have to use .Equals to compare strings (in response to a comment). == does the same thing.

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if(txtName.Text == "John")

This is more conventional and efficient way of these you have shown.

String name = txtName.Text
if (name == "John")
    ;

Declaring extra variable "name" will increase the code size with any benefit except increasing the program memory. Once I tried and found declaring extra variable and assigning text to it and later accessing this variable instead of text property txtName.Text makes it less efficient then accessing through property.

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