Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a code segment something like this:

def test() : Seq[Int] = 
  List("A", "B", "C") collect {
    case "A" => 1
    case "B" => 2
    //case _ => println(_)
  }

Now I would like to print specific values (just for debugging) on the output without adding any elements to the resulting collection. If I uncomment the commented line, Scala infers the value of the expression to Seq[Any], which is completely understandable.

Anybody got any hints how to do this? Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

flatMap

List("A", "B", "C") flatMap {
    case "A" => List(1)
    case "B" => List(2)
    case x => println(x); Nil
}

collect/flatten

List("A", "B", "C").collect {
    case "A" => Some(1)
    case "B" => Some(2)
    case x => println(x); None
}.flatten
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, works like charm. –  rlegendi May 27 '12 at 17:31
def skipped: Nothing = throw new Exception("Oops, not skipped after all!")

List("A", "B", "C") collect {
  case "A" => 1
  case "B" => 2
  case x if { println(x); false } => skipped
}

object PrintSkip {
  def unapply(a: Any): Option[Any] = {
    println(a)
    None
  }
}

List(Some("A"), None, Some("C")) collect {
  case Some("A") => 1
  case None => 2
  case Some(PrintSkip(_)) => skipped
}
share|improve this answer
    
wow, that is ugly! collect just swallows any exception? –  Kim Stebel May 27 '12 at 17:59
1  
@KimStebel - No, no. Look more carefully. case _ => has type Unit. We need type Nothing. But we never reach that point because the conditional is always false. –  Rex Kerr May 27 '12 at 18:01
    
Nice workaround, thx! –  rlegendi May 27 '12 at 18:10
    
oh right....... –  Kim Stebel May 27 '12 at 18:18
    
Very clever. Since Nothing is a subtype of all other types, skipped can fill any hole. –  Dan Burton May 27 '12 at 19:41

With collect, no need for wrapping things in an Option.

List("A", "B", "C").collect(new PartialFunction[String, Int] {
  def apply(s:String):Int = s match {
    case "A" => 1
    case "B" => 2
  }

  def isDefinedAt(s:String) = {
    try {
      apply(s)
      true
    } catch {
      case e:MatchError => { println(s); false }
    }

  }
})
share|improve this answer
1  
While you do avoid using Option, this adds an annoying amount of duplication, and relies on performing an effect whenever collect invokes isDefinedAt, which is creepy (though intriguing). –  Dan Burton May 27 '12 at 19:46
    
removed duplication. –  Kim Stebel May 27 '12 at 23:50
    
What I mean by duplication is that in apply you match on "A" and "B", and then in isDefinedAt you check for == "A" and for == "B". –  Dan Burton May 29 '12 at 4:51
1  
Oops, I screwed up the edit apparently. Now it's fixed. –  Kim Stebel May 29 '12 at 12:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.