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Good day!

Today I was writing a small script with Python 3.2.2, and this simple piece of the code decided to give me trouble.

def main():
    yn = ""
    #...
    while True:
        #...
        yn = input( "---> " )
        if yn.lower() != "y":
            break

Now, it should be pretty obvious what this code does however when I run it in IDLE on Windows 7 it works perfectly fine, alternatively when I double click on the script's icon on my Desktop and open it, it does not matter weather or not I enter "y" it closes, of course this is an easy fix by writing:

if yn.lower() == "n":
   #...

which is what I did, however I was wondering what the cause of this could be?

share|improve this question
    
Does the ---> get written to stdout when you run it from the desktop? –  Joel Cornett May 27 '12 at 18:37
1  
Side note: in Python you don't need to declare variables, so yn = "" is useless. –  rubik May 27 '12 at 18:39
1  
@Levon: OP says python 3.2, so it would be input() not raw_input() –  Joel Cornett May 27 '12 at 18:50
    
To diagnose, put print(repr(yn.lower())) and input() before break. You will see what was entered. –  sdcvvc May 27 '12 at 19:20
    
@Joel Cornett how would one tell? –  The Floating Brain May 27 '12 at 19:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It works for me on OSX (Python 3.2.2):

yn = ""
while True:
    yn = input( "---> " )
    if yn.lower() != "y":
      break


pu@pumbair:~$ python3.2 test.py 
---> y
---> y
---> Y
---> Y
---> 
pu@pumbair:~$ python3.2 test.py 
---> n
pu@pumbair:~$ 

What executable is associated with the .py extension?

share|improve this answer
    
It was, did it worked for Python 3.2.0 for you? –  The Floating Brain May 27 '12 at 19:35

Are you sure you are using 3.2.2 rather than 3.2.0?

There's a bug in Python 3.2.0 on Windows that reading from stdin sometimes leaves a \r on the end of the string and that would explain what you're seeing. Use yn.strip().lower() to workaround the bug or update to the current version (3.2.3).

The specific issue is described as http://bugs.python.org/issue11272, but if you are using 3.2.2 it should have been fixed.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow I feel kinda dumb, I thought I had gotton 3.2.2, but apparently not, thanks! :-D –  The Floating Brain May 27 '12 at 19:30

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