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I'm new to CUDA and I'm probably doing something wrong. All I need is logical operation on two binary vectors. Length of vectors is 2048000. I compared speed between logical and in Matlab's C mex file and in CUDA kernel. C on CPU is ~5% faster than CUDA. Please note that I measured only kernel execution (without memory transfer). I have i7 930 and 9800GT.

##MEX file testCPU.c:##

#include "mex.h"
void mexFunction( int nlhs, mxArray *plhs[],
        int nrhs, const mxArray *prhs[] ) {

    int i, varLen;
    unsigned char *vars, *output;

    vars = mxGetPr(prhs[0]);
    plhs[0] = mxCreateLogicalMatrix(2048000, 1);
    output = mxGetPr(plhs[0]);
    for (i=0;i<2048000;i++){
        output[i] = vars[i] & vars[2048000+i];
    }
}

Compile

mex testCPU.c

Create vectors

vars = ~~(randi(2,2048000,2)-1);

Measure speed:

tic;testCPU(vars);toc;

CUDA:

#CUDA file testGPU.cu#
#include "mex.h"
#include "cuda.h"

__global__ void logical_and(unsigned char* in, unsigned char* out, int N) {
    int idx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x+threadIdx.x;
    out[idx] = in[idx] && in[idx+N];
}


void mexFunction( int nlhs, mxArray *plhs[],
        int nrhs, const mxArray *prhs[] ) {

    int i;
    unsigned char *vars, *output, *gpu, *gpures;

    vars = (unsigned char*)mxGetData(prhs[0]);

    plhs[0] = mxCreateLogicalMatrix(2048000, 1);
    output = (unsigned char*)mxGetData(plhs[0]);       

    cudaEvent_t start, stop;
    cudaEventCreate(&start);
    cudaEventCreate(&stop);
    float dt_ms;

    // input GPU malloc
    cudaEventRecord(start, 0);
    cudaMalloc( (void **) &gpu, sizeof(unsigned char)*4096000);
    cudaEventRecord(stop, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize(stop);
    cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop);
    printf("GPU input malloc: %f ms, %i\n", dt_ms, cudaGetLastError());

    // output GPU malloc
    cudaEventRecord(start, 0);
    cudaMalloc( (void **) &gpures, sizeof(unsigned char)*2048000);
    cudaEventRecord(stop, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize(stop);
    cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop);
    printf("GPU output malloc: %f ms, %i\n", dt_ms, cudaGetLastError());

    // copy from CPU to GPU
    cudaEventRecord(start, 0);
    cudaMemcpy( gpu, vars, sizeof(unsigned char)*4096000, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
    cudaEventRecord(stop, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize(stop);
    cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop);
    printf("copy input from CPU to GPU: %f ms, %i\n", dt_ms, cudaGetLastError());

    dim3 dimBlock(32);
    printf("thread count: %i\n", dimBlock.x);
    dim3 dimGrid(2048000/dimBlock.x);
    printf("block count: %i\n", dimGrid.x);

    // --- KERNEL ---
    cudaEventRecord(start, 0);
    logical_and<<<dimGrid, dimBlock>>>(gpu, gpures, 2048000);
    cudaEventRecord(stop, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize(stop);
    cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop);
    printf("GPU kernel: %f ms, %i\n", dt_ms, cudaGetLastError());

    // result from GPU to CPU
    cudaEventRecord(start, 0);
    cudaMemcpy( output, gpures, sizeof(unsigned char)*2048000, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost );
    cudaEventRecord(stop, 0);
    cudaEventSynchronize(stop);
    cudaEventElapsedTime(&dt_ms, start, stop);
    printf("copy output from GPU to CPU: %f ms, %i\n", dt_ms, cudaGetLastError());


    cudaFree(gpu);
    cudaFree(gpures);

}

Compile:

 nvmex -f nvmexopts_9.bat testGPU.cu 
-I"C:\Program Files\NVIDIA GPU Computing Toolkit\CUDA\v4.2\include" 
-L"C:\Program Files\NVIDIA GPU Computing Toolkit\CUDA\v4.2\lib\x64" -lcudart -lcufft

Output:

GPU input malloc: 0.772160 ms, 0
GPU output malloc: 0.041728 ms, 0
copy input from CPU to GPU: 1.494784 ms, 0
thread count: 32
block count: 64000
*** GPU kernel: 3.761216 ms, 0 ***
copy output from GPU to CPU: 1.203488 ms, 0

Is that code OK? CPU was ~0.1ms faster than CUDA kernel. I tried different thread counts (multipliers of 32) up to 512, 32 was fastest. Operator & instead of && was almost 1ms slower.

Is 9800GT really so weak? What speed-up can I expect with today's mainstream card (ie. GTX460,560)?

Thank you

EDIT: based on talonmies' comment, I made these modifications:

Kernel function:

__global__ void logical_and(uchar4* in, uchar4* out, int N) {
    int idx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x+threadIdx.x;
    out[idx].x = in[idx].x & in[idx+N].x;
    out[idx].y = in[idx].y & in[idx+N].y;
    out[idx].z = in[idx].z & in[idx+N].z;
    out[idx].w = in[idx].w & in[idx+N].w;
}

Main function:

uchar4 *gpu, *gpures;

// 32 was worst, 64,128,256,512 were similar
dim3 dimBlock(128);
// block count is now 4xtimes smaller
dim3 dimGrid(512000/dimBlock.x);

Output:

GPU input malloc: 0.043360 ms, 0
GPU output malloc: 0.038592 ms, 0
copy input from CPU to GPU: 1.499584 ms, 0
thread count: 128
block count: 4000
*** GPU kernel: 0.131296 ms, 0 ***
copy output from GPU to CPU: 1.281120 ms, 0

Is that correct? Almost 30x speed-up! It seems too good to be true, but result is correct :) How faster will be GTX560 on this particular task? Thx

Edit 2:

Is this code

__global__ void logical_and(uchar4* in, uchar4* out, int N) {
    int idx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x+threadIdx.x;

    out[idx].x = in[idx].x & in[idx+N].x;
    out[idx].y = in[idx].y & in[idx+N].y;
    out[idx].z = in[idx].z & in[idx+N].z;
    out[idx].w = in[idx].w & in[idx+N].w;
}

automatically transformed to:

__global__ void logical_and(uchar4* in, uchar4* out, int N) {
    int idx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x+threadIdx.x;  
    uchar4 buff;

    buff.x = in[idx].x;
    buff.y = in[idx].y;
    buff.z = in[idx].z;
    buff.w = in[idx].w;

    buff.x &= in[idx+N].x;
    buff.y &= in[idx+N].y;
    buff.z &= in[idx+N].z;
    buff.w &= in[idx+N].w;

    out[idx].x = buff.x;
    out[idx].y = buff.y;
    out[idx].z = buff.z;
    out[idx].w = buff.w;
}

by compiler?

If it is correct, it explains my confusion about coalesced access. I thought that in[idx] & in[idx+N] leads to non-coalesced access, because of accessing non-contiguous memory. But in fact, in[idx] and in[idx+N] are loaded in two coalesced steps. N can be any multiple of 16, because uchar4 is 4 bytes long, and for coalesced access address must be aligned to 64 bytes (on 1.1 device). Am I right?

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7  
Your code is using byte size memory transactions, which are very suboptimal on a compute 1.1 device. Try using 32 bit memory transactions instead (so uchar4 for example) and have each thread process 4 inputs rather than 1. –  talonmies May 27 '12 at 19:30
    
Try changing block size from 32 to at least 256 –  Jawad Masood May 28 '12 at 4:02
    
In modified code, 128 worked best. 256 was almost the same (1-2% slower), 512 was ~15% slower –  eel May 28 '12 at 7:54
1  
@eel: Be a bit careful with your uchar4 version if you plan to run it on a Fermi or newer card. While it looks like nvopencc has compiled the kernel to use 32 bit loads and stores, you are a bit "lucky" that it did. You should explicit load the complete uchar4 inputs to local variables, then compute the result in a local variable and store the local uchar4 result back to global memory. The compiler(s) are much more likely to generate the code you want in that case. But 30x memory bandwidth improvement is probably about right for a compute 1.1 card. –  talonmies May 28 '12 at 20:40
    
@talonmies: This is important comment for me. Please check edit2 –  eel May 29 '12 at 10:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As talonmies pointed out, you're accessing and processing your data byte-wise, which is far from optimal. A collection of techniques you may want to consider, such as Instruction-Level Parallelism and buffered read/writes, are summarized in the nVidia Webinar Better Performance at Lower Occupancy by Vasily Volkov.

In a nutshell, what you want to do is, in each thread, read several uint4 in a coalesced way, process them, and only then store them.

Update

Does it make any difference if you re-write your code as follows?

__global__ void logical_and(unsigned int* in, unsigned int* out, int N) {
    int idx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x*chunksize+threadIdx.x;
    unsigned int buff[chunksize];
    #pragma unroll
    for ( int k = 0 ; k < chunksize ; k++ )
        buff[k] = in[ blockDim.x*k + idx ];
    #pragma unroll
    for ( int k = 0 ; k < chunksize ; k++ )
        buff[k] &= in[ blockDim.x*k + idx + N ];
    #pragma unroll
    for ( int k = 0 ; k < chunksize ; k++ )
        out[ blockDim.x*k + idx ] = buff[k];
}

Note that I've assumed chunksize is a variable you've #defined somewhere, e.g.

#define chunksize 4

And that you have to divide the number of blocks you launch and N by that number. I've also used unsigned int which is just four packed uchar. In your calling function, you may have to cast your pointers accordingly.

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great webinar, thanks –  eel May 28 '12 at 11:39
    
I tried process 2 uchar4 in each thread, but the speed remains the same –  eel May 28 '12 at 12:43
    
Using uint4 instead of uchar4 was ~15% slower –  eel May 28 '12 at 12:51
    
@eel: Are you accessing them in a coalesced way? This is an important detail. –  Pedro May 28 '12 at 13:21
    
I read many materials on the coalesced memory access topic, but still I'm not sure I understand it. When the index in kernel is determined as: idx = blockIdx.x*blockDim.x+threadIdx.x, then memory access to array[idx] is ALWAYS coalesced (because cudaMalloc is aligned to 256 bytes). When I compute result as (array[idx] & array[idx+N]), access is NOT coalesced, because I'm accessing non-contiguous memory area. I think that the problem in my case is that second vector is located after the first one. They should be "interlaced" (to access in coalesced way). Am I right? How can I do that? Thanks –  eel May 28 '12 at 18:36

What i think its happening is called false sharing. I think the problem is that the byte-sized regions you are trying to write from your threads are producing a massive race condition because different threads are trying to write to the same word-aligned address. I'm not sure the details in GPU, but in CPU, when different threads try to write to memory in the same 256-byte aligned region (called cache lines) they will continuously block each other, plummeting your global performance.

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