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I think I have a fairly basic question here. I'm not trying to waste your time, but I just didn't know what to Google to get a good answer. My question has to do with object initialization. Take the following example from the Head First C# book:

using System;
using etc...

namespace Bees
{
   public partial class Form1 : Form
    {
        public Form1()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            Queen queenie = new Queen(workers, Report); //Queen is a created class
        }
        Queen queenie; //This is the line I'm curious about

        private void assignButton_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            Report.AppendText(queenie.AssignWork(comboBox1.SelectedItem.ToString(), (int)shifts.Value));
        }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            queenie.WorkNextShift();
        }
...

If I've already instantiated a Queen object by saying Queen queenie = new Queen(...);, what purpose does the Queen queenie line serve, and what is its scope? What key concept am I misunderstanding here?

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1 Answer

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It looks like a bug in the code. Probably this was meant:

public Form1()
{
    InitializeComponent();
    queenie = new Queen(workers, Report);
}

Queen queenie; //This is where the reference to the constructed Queen is stored

The line Queen queenie; declares a field of type Queen that is accessible from all methods of the instance, but not from outside the class.

If you are uncertain what some of these terms mean, I suggest that you follow a more gentle tutorial:

Or if you already blew your book budget for the year then browse some of the free online documentaition:

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I'm pretty new. Is there any chance you could explain this in less technical terms? –  Adam Hollander May 27 '12 at 20:14
    
@AdamHollander: If you really want to learn the very basics, I think it's better to start with a very simple tutorial. See here –  Mark Byers May 27 '12 at 20:30
    
@AdamHollander You can try thenewboston on youtube, he has some great tutorials on programming - youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0EE421AE8BCEBA4A&feature=plcp –  leaf68 May 27 '12 at 20:43
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