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#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

/* prototypes for functions */
void getstring(char *sentence);
int check(char *sentence, int missing[26]);
void showNegativeResults(int[]);

int main(void) {
    char sentence[1024] = {'\0'};
    int missing[26] = {0};

    printf("Enter sentence\n(ending with a period like this one).\n\n");
    getstring(sentence);

    printf("\nSentence: \"%s.\"", sentence);    

    if ( check(sentence, missing) )
        printf("\n\nThe sentence IS a pangram!\n\n");
    else
        showNegativeResults(missing);

    return 0;
}

void getstring(char *sentence) {
    int j = 0;
   while ((sentence[j] = getchar()) != '.')
      j++;
   sentence[j] = '\0';
}

int check(char *sentence, int missing[26]) {

    return 1; /* return a 1 if it is a pangram*/

    return 0; /*return 0 if it is not a pangram */
}

void showNegativeResults(int missing[26]) {
    int c;
    printf("\n\nThe sentence is NOT a pangram.\n");
    printf("Missing letters:");
    for(c = 0; c < 26; c++)
        if (missing[c])
            printf(" %c", ('a' + c));
    printf("\n\n");
}

I need help implementing a function that will decipher whether the characters in the string contain all the letters of the alphabet and if they don't allow the user to know which ones are missing.

share|improve this question
    
I was thinking about checking the character values against their integer equivalents. – Michael_19 May 27 '12 at 20:19

Have you been taught about invariants? I suggest you look for an invariant that generalizes these two special cases:

  • If you have not looked at any part of the sentence, you must consider that all letters are missing.

  • If you have looked at all of the sentence, then as you have written, the missing data structure contains exactly those letters that are missing from the sentence.

I also suggest you look up the ANSI C functions isalpha and tolower.

share|improve this answer
    
Have not been taught about invariants. I implemented 'tolower' into my getstring function so that all the characters are lower case. I was going to check the values of all the inter values against a total that they should be to contain all letters of the alphabet exactly but that would only solve half the problem, I also want to let the user know which letters are missing. – Michael_19 May 27 '12 at 20:56

An answer without doing your homework ...

1) get the character
2) is it a "."
   a) check if you have all and return result.
   b) continue
3) is it greater than/equal "A" but less than/equal "Z" ( this defines a range of characters )
   a) add it to list return to (1)
   b) continue
4) is it greater than/equal "a" but less than/equal "z" ( another range, could be combined with the first )
   a) add it to list return to (1)
   b) continue
5) is it a " " ( a space .. but could be another range, could be combined with the first )
  a) continue 
6) error not a correct character and exit
share|improve this answer
    
Your algorithm is only considering letters as valid characters, hence it will fail if the input string has any numbers, spaces, commas and other kinds of common text characters. – Thomas C. G. de Vilhena May 28 '12 at 0:30
    
Well it is homework.... Problem didn't specify anything other than alpha, but I'll correct. – Dtyree May 28 '12 at 0:53

Inside check, you can iterate through the string sentence and for each character you encounter, change missing to 1 for that character.

At the end, the missing characters will be marked with 0. If missing contains at least a 0, you return 0, otherwise 1.

I'm not going to write the full code, but some hints to get you started:

1) You can mark the correct element using currentCharacter - 'a'. This will return you the index of character currentCharacter.

2) You can iterate through the string using

char currentCharacter;
while( currentCharacter = *(sentence++) )
{
   //mark array here
}
share|improve this answer

Just iterate through the input string marking which characters are in it, then check the ones that are missing:

int main()
{
    char str[] = "Some meaningful text";

    int freq[256];
    int i;

    for ( i = 0; i < 256; i ++) // clear frequency array
    {
        freq[i] = 0;
    }

    for (i = 0; str[i] != '\0'; i++) // parse input string
    {
        freq[str[i]]++;
    }

    for ( i = 0; i < 256; i ++)
    {
        if (freq[i]==0 && isalpha(i)) // find out which leters weren't typed
        {
            printf("%c letter wasn't typed!\n", (char)i);
        }
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I cannot use the sting.h library – Michael_19 May 27 '12 at 20:50
1  
If you can't use string.h simply replace the i < len condition by str[i] != '\0'. I have updated the answer to show you that. – Thomas C. G. de Vilhena May 27 '12 at 21:17
    
I don't quite understand what you are doing in the "parse input string" step. – Michael_19 May 28 '12 at 0:55
    
I was reading the homework tag explanation and I realized that I shouldn't have written an answer, but provided guidance on how to solve the problem, so I'm sorry for that :). Anyway, that step is simply building a histogram on the occurrence of ASCII characters. – Thomas C. G. de Vilhena May 28 '12 at 22:53

The simplest way I can think of going about this would be to loop through each letter of the alphabet and check if the letter is in the sentence(by looping through the sentence until the letter was found or you reach the end of the sentence). If the letter is not in the sentence, add the number (corresponding to the missing letter) to your array.

here's the working function:

int check(char *sentence, int missing[26]) 
{
  int missIndex = 0; //the index for the missing array;
  bool iWasFound; //was the letter found?  (used in the loops below)

  for(char i = 'A'; i <= 'Z'; i++)
  {
    iWasFound = false;

    for(int j = 0; j < 1024; j++)
    {
      if(toupper(sentence[j]) == i)
      {
        iWasFound = true;
        break;
      }
    }

    //if we did not find the letter, add the corresponding number to the missing array
    if(!iWasFound)
    {
      missing[missIndex] = (int)(i - 'A');
      cout << (int)(i - 'A') << " | " << missing[missIndex] << std::endl;
      missIndex++;
    }
  }

  if(missing[0] == -1)
  {
    return 1;
  }
  else
  {
    return 0;
  }
}

let me know if you need me to explain anything

share|improve this answer

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