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Let it be std::list::iterator and std::list::reverse_iterator. Is reverse one derived from forward? And if not then why there're not reverse equivalents for member functions of list?

Thanks in advance.

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No, there's no inheritance relation between them. What kind of reverse operations where you expecting? –  larsmans May 27 '12 at 22:34
    
@larsmans I expect possibility of doing my_list.erase(reverse_i) –  tonytony May 27 '12 at 22:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let it be std::list::iterator and std::list::reverse_iterator. Is reverse one derived from forward?

Not necessarily, they may (and probably are in most implementations) different types. Iterators are copied around all the time, and this inheritance would cause slicing. Plus, all operations on iterator should be virtual to avoid inconsistencies, which would be inefficient. Thinking about it, it would make sense for the standard to even forbid inheritance as a possible implementation (and maybe it does, indirectly).

Update: The standard provides a definition for std::reverse_iterator class template, and mandates that std::list::reverse_iterator is a specialization of such template. Inheritance is not a possible implementation.

And if not then why there're not reverse equivalents for member functions of list?

Because you can call base() on a reverse_iterator to get the underlying regular iterator. The fundamental relation between a reverse_iterator and its corresponding iterator i is that &*(reverse_iterator(i)) == &*(i - 1).

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1. I can get base iterator, but it's shifted and I shall do --i.base() or somethink like this. 2. What do you mean when you say "inheritance would cause slicing". What is slicing? –  tonytony May 27 '12 at 22:45
    
@tonytony: 1. Indeed, the fundamental relation is &*(reverse_iterator(i)) == &*(i - 1). You shouldn't do --i.base() because that (may?) changes the reverse_iterator position as well, but you can do i.base() - 1 since its a bidirectional iterator. 2. Its what happens when you mix inheritance with value semantics, search for it there is ton of information available. –  K-ballo May 27 '12 at 22:48
    
Okay, I've caught the point. Thanks. –  tonytony May 27 '12 at 22:51
    
+1 for the answer, but i.base() - 1 is not legal for anything but random access iterators, so you can't do that for std::list<> iterators (C++11 §24.2.6-7). –  ildjarn May 27 '12 at 23:05
    
@ildjarn: Oh boy I'm ashamed! So what's the alternative here? Copy the result from base() and decrement it? –  K-ballo May 27 '12 at 23:07

In GNU's implementation of the C++ standard library, there's a has-a relationship between a reverse_iterator and an iterator. (I haven't ever looked through the MSVC++ or llvm implementations, but I would imagine that they're the same.)

Basically, the reverse_iterator takes in an iterator and has a thin wrapper so that ++ aliases to -- and -- aliases to ++. Basically all of the operations are wrappers around the underlying non-reverse iterator.

And if not then why there're not reverse equivalents for member functions of list?

std::list does have a reverse iterator.

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