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Do you know of any way to delete all of the entries stored in Core Data? My schema should stay the same; I just want to reset it to blank.


Edit

I'm looking to do this programmatically so that a user can essentially hit a reset button.

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18 Answers 18

up vote 160 down vote accepted

You can still delete the file programmatically, using the NSFileManager:removeItemAtPath:: method.

NSPersistentStore *store = ...;
NSError *error;
NSURL *storeURL = store.URL;
NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *storeCoordinator = ...;
[storeCoordinator removePersistentStore:store error:&error];
[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtPath:storeURL.path error:&error];

Then, just add the persistent store back to ensure it is recreated properly.

The programmatic way for iterating through each entity is both slower and prone to error. The use for doing it that way is if you want to delete some entities and not others. However you still need to make sure you retain referential integrity or you won't be able to persist your changes.

Just removing the store and recreating it is both fast and safe, and can certainly be done programatically at runtime.

Update for iOS5+

With the introduction of external binary storage (allowsExternalBinaryDataStorage or Store in External Record File) in iOS 5 and OS X 10.7, simply deleting files pointed by storeURLs is not enough. You'll leave the external record files behind. Since the naming scheme of these external record files is not public, I don't have a universal solution yet. – an0 May 8 '12 at 23:00

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1  
This is probably the best solution for reliability. If I wanted to delete some but not all data, I would use this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1077810/… –  Michael Grinich Apr 7 '11 at 3:10
9  
I know how to properly retrieve the storeCoordinator. However I dont know how to get the persistentStore. So could you please give a proper example instead of just: NSPersistentStore * store = ...; –  Pascal Klein Jun 14 '11 at 12:33
9  
[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtURL:storeURL error:&error] is better. –  an0 Jun 23 '11 at 18:22
3  
NSError *error = nil; is better –  Tony Oct 14 '11 at 10:02
2  
Example code including how to recreate a new empty store here: stackoverflow.com/a/8467628 –  Joshua C. Lerner Nov 2 '12 at 2:35

You can delete the sqllite file - but I choose to do it by purging the tables individually with a functions:

- (void) deleteAllObjects: (NSString *) entityDescription  {
    NSFetchRequest *fetchRequest = [[NSFetchRequest alloc] init];
    NSEntityDescription *entity = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:entityDescription inManagedObjectContext:_managedObjectContext];
    [fetchRequest setEntity:entity];

    NSError *error;
    NSArray *items = [_managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:fetchRequest error:&error];
    [fetchRequest release];


    for (NSManagedObject *managedObject in items) {
    	[_managedObjectContext deleteObject:managedObject];
    	DLog(@"%@ object deleted",entityDescription);
    }
    if (![_managedObjectContext save:&error]) {
    	DLog(@"Error deleting %@ - error:%@",entityDescription,error);
    }

}

The reason I chose to do it table by table is that it makes me confirm as I am doing the programming that deleting the contents of the table is sensible and there is not data that I would rather keep.

Doing it this will is much slower than just deleting the file and I will change to a file delete if I this method takes too long.

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Great solution. Thanks. What's DLog()? –  Michael Grinich Jul 3 '09 at 12:15
    
Ah yes - sorry that is a special function I use that only does an NSLog when the build is a DEBUG build - just replace with NSLog. –  Grouchal Jul 3 '09 at 14:33
5  
You can see an implementation of DLog here: cimgf.com/2009/01/24/dropping-nslog-in-release-builds –  Matt Long Oct 1 '09 at 17:28
3  
This works nicely for me. But to make it go faster, is there a way to delete all the objects of a certain entity with one command? Like in SQL you could do something like, DROP TABLE entity_name. I don't want to delete the whole SQL file because I only want to delete all objects of a specific entity, not other entities. –  MattDiPasquale Aug 29 '10 at 5:51
6  
Use NSDictionary *allEntities = _managedObjectModel.entitiesByName; to get all entities in your model and then you can iterate over the keys in this NSDictionary to purge all entities in the store. –  adam0101 Feb 25 '12 at 20:04

I've written a clearStores method that goes through every store and delete it both from the coordinator and the filesystem (error handling left aside):

NSArray *stores = [persistentStoreCoordinator persistentStores];

for(NSPersistentStore *store in stores) {
    [persistentStoreCoordinator removePersistentStore:store error:nil];
    [[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtPath:store.URL.path error:nil];
}

[persistentStoreCoordinator release], persistentStoreCoordinator = nil;

This method is inside a coreDataHelper class that takes care of (among other things) creating the persistentStore when it's nil.

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Is the complete source code available elsewhere ? –  onmyway133 Jul 27 at 10:46

I remove all data from core data on a button Event in a HomeViewController class: This article helped me so much I figured I'd contribute.

-(IBAction)buttonReset:(id)sender
{
    NSLog(@"buttonReset Pressed");

    //Erase the persistent store from coordinator and also file manager.
    NSPersistentStore *store = [self.persistentStoreCoordinator.persistentStores lastObject];
    NSError *error = nil;
    NSURL *storeURL = store.URL;
    [self.persistentStoreCoordinator removePersistentStore:store error:&error];
    [[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtURL:storeURL error:&error];


    NSLog(@"Data Reset");

    //Make new persistent store for future saves   (Taken From Above Answer)
    if (![self.persistentStoreCoordinator addPersistentStoreWithType:NSSQLiteStoreType configuration:nil URL:storeURL options:nil error:&error]) {
        // do something with the error
    }

}

Note that in order to call self.persistentStoreCoordinator I declared a property in the Home View Controller. (Don't worry about the managedObjectContext that I use for saving and loading.)

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSManagedObjectContext        *   managedObjectContext;
@property (nonatomic, retain) NSPersistentStoreCoordinator  *   persistentStoreCoordinator;

Then in the AppDelegate ApplicationDidFinishLaunching right below creating a HomeViewController I have :

homeViewController = [[HomeViewController alloc] initWithNibName:@"HomeViewController" bundle:nil];
homeViewController.managedObjectContext = self.managedObjectContext;
homeViewController.persistentStoreCoordinator = self.persistentStoreCoordinator;
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Thank you for posting the FULL explanation with all of the proper code. –  Michael D. Dec 20 '11 at 17:59
    
Nice, this is the how you post code. –  RyeMAC3 Aug 1 '12 at 14:35
    
@ayteat, did this work for you?. for me its not working, please have a look at this stackoverflow.com/questions/14646595/… –  Ranjit Feb 4 '13 at 7:00
    
nice job atreat, it works great.... –  Jignesh Chanchiya Apr 19 '13 at 9:02
1  
THIS IS THE ANSWER except use "AppDelegate *ad = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];" and replace self with ad. and dont copy last two bits of code –  CescSergey Feb 26 at 5:13

MagicalRecord makes this very easy.

[MyCoreDataObject MR_truncateAll];
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10  
this is cool, but off topic since I specified a CoreData solution –  Michael Grinich Apr 7 '11 at 3:11
7  
Active Record Fetching is a core data solution. –  casademora Apr 15 '11 at 19:18
5  
But an answer like this goes beyond the scope of the question. There is no reason to assume he wants to use an addt'l framework to do this. –  orange80 Jul 27 '11 at 16:13
5  
update the link: github.com/magicalpanda/MagicalRecord –  malaba Feb 21 '12 at 11:22
    
While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. –  Mathew MacLean May 19 at 10:29

If you want to delete all objects and do not want to delete the backing files, you can use following methods:

- (void)deleteAllObjectsInContext:(NSManagedObjectContext *)context
                       usingModel:(NSManagedObjectModel *)model
{
    NSArray *entities = model.entities;
    for (NSEntityDescription *entityDescription in entities) {
        [self deleteAllObjectsWithEntityName:entityDescription.name
                                   inContext:context];
    }
}

- (void)deleteAllObjectsWithEntityName:(NSString *)entityName
                             inContext:(NSManagedObjectContext *)context
{
    NSFetchRequest *fetchRequest =
        [NSFetchRequest fetchRequestWithEntityName:entityName];
    fetchRequest.includesPropertyValues = NO;
    fetchRequest.includesSubentities = NO;

    NSError *error;
    NSArray *items = [context executeFetchRequest:fetchRequest error:&error];

    for (NSManagedObject *managedObject in items) {
        [context deleteObject:managedObject];
        NSLog(@"Deleted %@", entityName);
    }
}

Beware that it may be very slow (depends on how many objects are in your object graph).

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how to remove the older data (say three tables, from one table I want to clear data)when app updates –  Madan Mohan Jun 11 '13 at 16:44

[Late answer in response to a bounty asking for newer responses]

Looking over earlier answers,

  • Fetching and deleting all items, as suggested by @Grouchal and others, is still an effective and useful solution. If you have very large data stores then it might be slow, but it still works very well.
  • Simply removing the data store is, as you and @groundhog note, no longer effective. It's obsolete even if you don't use external binary storage because iOS 7 uses WAL mode for SQLite journalling. With WAL mode there may be (potentially large) journal files sitting around for any Core Data persistent store.

But there's a different, similar approach to removing the persistent store that does work. The key is to put your persistent store file in its own sub-directory that doesn't contain anything else. Don't just stick it in the documents directory (or wherever), create a new sub-directory just for the persistent store. The contents of that directory will end up being the persistent store file, the journal files, and the external binary files. If you want to nuke the entire data store, delete that directory and they'll all disappear.

You'd do something like this when setting up your persistent store:

NSURL *storeDirectoryURL = [[self applicationDocumentsDirectory] URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"persistent-store"];
if ([[NSFileManager defaultManager] createDirectoryAtURL:storeDirectoryURL
        withIntermediateDirectories:NO
        attributes:nil
        error:nil]) {
    NSURL *storeURL = [storeDirectoryURL URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"MyApp.sqlite"];
    // continue with storeURL as usual...
}

Then when you wanted to remove the store,

[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtURL:storeDirectoryURL error:nil];

That recursively removes both the custom sub-directory and all of the Core Data files in it.

This only works if you don't already have your persistent store in the same folder as other, important data. Like the documents directory, which probably has other useful stuff in it. If that's your situation, you could get the same effect by looking for files that you do want to keep and removing everything else. Something like:

NSString *docsDirectoryPath = [[self applicationDocumentsDirectory] path];
NSArray *docsDirectoryContents = [[NSFileManager defaultManager] contentsOfDirectoryAtPath:docsDirectoryPath error:nil];
for (NSString *docsDirectoryItem in docsDirectoryContents) {
    // Look at docsDirectoryItem. If it's something you want to keep, do nothing.
    // If it's something you don't recognize, remove it.
}

This approach may be error prone. You've got to be absolutely sure that you know every file you want to keep, because otherwise you might remove important data. On the other hand, you can remove the external binary files without actually knowing the file/directory name used to store them.

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if you're afraid of the wal file, just disable it –  onmyway133 Jul 27 at 10:48

Here is combined solution for purging Core Data.

- (void)deleteAllObjectsInCoreData
{
    NSArray *allEntities = self.managedObjectModel.entities;
    for (NSEntityDescription *entityDescription in allEntities)
    {
        NSFetchRequest *fetchRequest = [[NSFetchRequest alloc] init];
        [fetchRequest setEntity:entityDescription];

        fetchRequest.includesPropertyValues = NO;
        fetchRequest.includesSubentities = NO;

        NSError *error;
        NSArray *items = [self.managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:fetchRequest error:&error];

        if (error) {
                NSLog(@"Error requesting items from Core Data: %@", [error localizedDescription]);
            }

        for (NSManagedObject *managedObject in items) {
            [self.managedObjectContext deleteObject:managedObject];
        }

        if (![self.managedObjectContext save:&error]) {
            NSLog(@"Error deleting %@ - error:%@", entityDescription, [error localizedDescription]);
        }
    }  
}
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If you want to go the delete all objects route (which is much simpler than tearing down the Core Data stack, but less performant), than this is a better implementation:

- (void)deleteAllManagedObjectsInModel:(NSManagedObjectModel *)managedObjectModel context:(NSManagedObjectContext *)managedObjectContext
{
    NSBlockOperation *operation = [NSBlockOperation blockOperationWithBlock:^{
        [managedObjectContext performBlockAndWait:^{
            for (NSEntityDescription *entity in managedObjectModel) {
                NSFetchRequest *fetchRequest = [NSFetchRequest new];
                [fetchRequest setEntity:entity];
                [fetchRequest setIncludesSubentities:NO];
                NSArray *objects = [managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:fetchRequest error:nil];
                for (NSManagedObject *managedObject in objects) {
                    [managedObjectContext deleteObject:managedObject];
                }            
            }

            [managedObjectContext save:nil];
        }];
    }];
    [operation setCompletionBlock:^{
        // Do stuff once the truncation is complete
    }];
    [operation start];
}

This implementation leverages NSOperation to perform the deletion off of the main thread and notify on completion. You may want to emit a notification or something within the completion block to bubble the status back to the main thread.

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As a quick reference to save searching elsewhere - recreating the persistent store after deleting it can be done with:

if (![persistentStoreCoordinator addPersistentStoreWithType:NSSQLiteStoreType configuration:nil URL:storeURL options:nil error:&error]) {
// do something with the error
}
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I tried your code, but xcode throws an exception on this line,So what you have to say about this. –  Ranjit Sep 2 '13 at 10:47

Thanks for the post. I followed it and it worked for me. But I had another issue that was not mentioned in any of the replies. So I am not sure if it was just me.

Anyway, thought I would post here the problem and my way that solved it.

I had a few records in the database, I wanted to purge everything clean before write new data to the db, so I did everything including

[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtURL:storeURL error:&error]; 

and then used managedObjectContext to access the database (supposed to be empty by now), somehow the data was still there. After a while of troubleshooting, I found that I need to reset managedObjectContext, managedObject, managedObjectModel and persistentStoreCoordinator, before I use managedObjectContext to access the dabase. Now I have a clean database to write to.

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Several good answers to this question. Here's a nice concise one. The first two lines delete the sqlite database. Then the for: loop deletes any objects in the managedObjectContext memory.

NSURL *storeURL = [[(FXYAppDelegate*)[[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate] applicationDocumentsDirectory] URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"AppName.sqlite"];
[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtURL:storeURL error:nil];
for (NSManagedObject *ct in [self.managedObjectContext registeredObjects]) {
    [self.managedObjectContext deleteObject:ct];
}
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Don't abuse the delegation for this purpose: hollance.com/2012/02/dont-abuse-the-app-delegate –  Michael Dorner Sep 5 '13 at 13:57

Here is a somewhat simplified version with less calls to AppDelegate self and the last bit of code that was left out of the top rated answer. Also I was getting an error "Object's persistent store is not reachable from this NSManagedObjectContext's coordinator" so just needed to add that back.

NSPersistentStoreCoordinator *storeCoordinator = [self persistentStoreCoordinator];
NSPersistentStore *store = [[storeCoordinator persistentStores] lastObject];
NSURL *storeURL = [[self applicationDocumentsDirectory] URLByAppendingPathComponent:@"dataModel"];
NSError *error;

[storeCoordinator removePersistentStore:store error:&error];
[[NSFileManager defaultManager] removeItemAtPath:storeURL.path error:&error];

[_persistentStoreCoordinator addPersistentStoreWithType:NSSQLiteStoreType configuration:nil URL:storeURL options:nil error:&error];

if (storeCoordinator != nil) {
    _managedObjectContext = [[NSManagedObjectContext alloc] init];
    [_managedObjectContext setPersistentStoreCoordinator:storeCoordinator];
}
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you can also find all the entity names, and delete them by name. Its a longer version but works well, that way you dont have to work with persistence store

 - (void)clearCoreData
{
NSError *error;
NSEntityDescription *des = [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Any_Entity_Name" inManagedObjectContext:_managedObjectContext];
NSManagedObjectModel *model = [des managedObjectModel];
NSArray *entityNames = [[model entities] valueForKey:@"name"];

for (NSString *entityName in entityNames){

    NSFetchRequest *deleteAll = [NSFetchRequest fetchRequestWithEntityName:entityName];
    NSArray *matches = [self.database.managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:deleteAll error:&error];

}
    if (matches.count > 0){
        for (id obj in matches){

            [_managedObjectContext deleteObject:obj];
        }
       [self.database.managedObjectContext save:&error];
    }
}

for "Any_Entity_Name" just give any one of your entity's name, we only need to figure out the entity description your entities are within. ValueForKey@"name" will return all the entity names. Finally, dont forget to save.

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Delete sqlite from your fileURLPath and then build.

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I meant when the app is installed. –  Michael Grinich Apr 7 '11 at 3:08

Delete the persistent store file and setup a new persistent store coordinator?

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and do a build>clean. –  John Ballinger Jul 3 '09 at 5:14
4  
Doing a clean will not remove the persistent store files, thankfully. That would be a recipe for disaster if true. –  Hunter Jul 12 '09 at 18:05

swift solution:

class func deleteAllManagedObjects() {

        let modelURL = NSBundle.mainBundle().URLForResource("some string", withExtension: "mom")
        let mom = NSManagedObjectModel(contentsOfURL: modelURL)

        for entityName in mom.entitiesByName.keys {
            let fr = NSFetchRequest(entityName: entityName as String)
            let a = Utility.managedObjectContext().executeFetchRequest(fr, error: nil) as [NSManagedObject]
            for mo in a {
                Utility.managedObjectContext().deleteObject(mo)
            }
        }

        Utility.managedObjectContext().save(nil)
    }
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you're all making this seem complicated. You can just send your NSManagedObjectContext the reset method

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8  
That only resets unsaved changes instead of removing all objects. –  Sam Soffes May 23 '12 at 0:41

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